Share
News

Top House Democrat Steps Up Demands for Trump's Tax Returns

Share

A top House Democrat on Saturday ratcheted up his demand for access to President Donald Trump‘s tax returns, telling the IRS that the law clearly gives Congress a right to them. The government’s failure to respond by an April 23 deadline could send the dispute into federal court.

The response by Rep. Richard Neal, the House Ways and Means Committee chairman, comes after the Trump administration asked for more time to consider his initial request last week.

Neal had requested six years of Trump’s personal and business tax returns.

The Massachusetts Democrat argues that a 1920-era law saying the IRS “shall furnish” any tax return requested by Congress “is unambiguous and raises no complicated legal issues” and that the Treasury Department’s objections lack merit.

Trending:
Netanyahu Skewers Agitators Who Proclaim 'Gays for Gaza' with Brilliant One-Liner

The letter to IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig is the latest exchange in a tug of war over Trump’s returns, which some argue would give lawmakers far greater insight into the president’s business dealings and potential conflicts of interest as it exercises its oversight role.

Trump declined to provide his tax information as a candidate in 2016 and as president, something party nominees have chosen to do since Richard Nixon started the practice in 1969.

During the campaign, Trump said he wanted to release his returns but said because he was under a routine audit, “I can’t.” After the November midterm elections, Trump said during a news conference that the filings were too complex for people to understand.

Do you think President Trump should release his tax returns?

The issue appears sure to end up in federal court. With an eye to a legal challenge, Neal told Rettig that he has two weeks to respond — by 5 p.m. on April 23.

If Rettig fails to do so, Neal said he will interpret as denying the request, which could pave the way for a court battle. Neal also could seek the returns through a subpoena.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who oversees the IRS, told Neal this past week that he needs more time to consider the unprecedented demand for Trump’s returns and needs to consult with the Justice Department about it.

Mnuchin accused lawmakers of seeking Trump’s returns for political reasons. But he also acknowledged his “statutory responsibilities” and that he respects congressional oversight.

Some Treasury-watchers observe that Mnuchin’s decision to consult with the Justice Department could suggest that Treasury lawyers believe Neal has a legal right to Trump’s returns.

Related:
Secret Service Tells Trump to Change His Rally Plans

Neal claimed Saturday that the administration has no right “to question or second guess” his motivations.

Trump’s acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, has said Democrats will “never” see the returns, “nor should they,” and “they know it.” Mulvaney added that it was “already litigated during the election” and the American people “elected him anyway.”

William Consovoy, whose firm was retained by Trump to represent him on the matter, has written the Treasury’s general counsel and said the congressional request “would set a dangerous precedent” if granted and that the IRS cannot legally divulge the information.

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , , , ,
Share
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands. Photo credit: @AP on Twitter
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation