Share

UK plans to introduce 'no-fault' divorce for first time

Share

LONDON (AP) — Britain wants to end the divorce blame game.

The government has announced plans to introduce “no-fault” divorces so separating couples no longer have to blame one another for the breakdown of a marriage.

Justice Secretary David Gauke said Tuesday that the government will introduce legislation after a public consultation revealed broad support for change.

Until now, couples have had to prove misconduct such as adultery by one partner or live apart for a fixed period before they could divorce.

The proposed changes would only require the couple to declare that their marriage had irretrievably broken down.

Trending:
Hundreds of Muslims Die During Traditional Mass Pilgrimage to Mecca

Jo Edwards, a family law specialist based at law firm Forsters, says lawyers will welcome steps to end “the unnecessary acrimony caused day in, day out by the current fault-based system.”

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Share
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands. Photo credit: @AP on Twitter
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation