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UK police say railway sabotage attempt linked to Brexit

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LONDON (AP) — British police said Tuesday that they are investigating two attempts to sabotage railway lines that are believed to be linked to Brexit.

The British Transport Police force said two “malicious obstructions” hit sections of rail line in central and eastern England on March 21 and 27.

In both cases, devices were attached to the tracks that were intended to disrupt services — though they failed.

There have been no arrests.

Assistant Chief Constable Sean O’Callaghan said police “are currently keeping an open mind on why someone would put their life at risk to place these items on a live railway.”

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“However our early assessment has led us to believe it relates to Britain’s exit from the European Union,” he said.

The force didn’t say why it had made that link. The Daily Mirror newspaper reported that a note attached to one device said “leave means leave” and vowed to “bring this country to its knees if we don’t leave.”

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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