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'Veep' star Julia Louis-Dreyfus no fan of Trump

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PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — “Veep” star Julia Louis-Dreyfus doesn’t know who she’ll support for president in 2020, but is sure about who she won’t.

She called Donald Trump a “pretend president” and said “I’m not a fan.”

Louis-Dreyfus was asked her political views Friday while promoting the final, seven-episode season of her HBO series, which begins on March 31. “Veep” has won three Emmys for best comedy series and the series star won four best actress awards.

She’s on location shooting a movie in Austria and said via satellite that she’s is constantly approached by people who ask her opinion on President Trump. She says she doesn’t hesitate to give an answer.

“I have no idea who I’m going to support in 2020 except to say that it’s a Democrat,” she said.

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She gave few hints about how “Veep” will end, except to say her character, Selina Meyer, “is as true to herself as she can possibly be.”

“Saying goodbye to it was a very hard thing to do, even though it was our decision,” she said.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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