Warren turns down a televised town hall on Fox News

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrat Elizabeth Warren is saying no to a televised town hall on Fox News, slamming the network as “a hate-for-profit racket that gives a megaphone to racists and conspiracists.”

Several of Warren’s rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination have already held or agreed to hold town halls with Fox News, including Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigieg.

But Warren tweeted Tuesday that while the network’s reporters are “welcome to come to my events just like any other outlet,” the senator from Massachusetts would not participate in a town hall that would help Fox “make even more money adding our valuable audience to their ratings numbers.”

A spokeswoman for Fox News did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez earlier this year restricted Fox News from hosting an official debate for the party, questioning the network’s ability to provide a “fair and neutral” forum.

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Ratings data showed that Sen. Sanders drew more viewers to his Fox News town hall than he did for similar forums on MSNBC and CNN.

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