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'Broke' Hunter Biden Says He Can't Pay Child Support, But Look Where He Was Caught During His Very Bad Day

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I don’t know how your Thursday went, but it had to be better than Hunter Biden’s.

For instance, Senate Oversight Committee Republicans released a form documenting an FBI informant’s allegations regarding Biden’s work with Ukraine energy giant Burisma; during the interview, the informant alleged that Burisma founder and CEO Mykola Zlochevsky paid $10 million in bribes to Hunter and father Joe Biden and thought Hunter was stupider than his dog but necessary to smooth things over in Washington.

Later in the day, the New York Post reported that on the same day it started its series of reports into the contents on Hunter Biden’s laptop back in October 2020 — and was subsequently locked out of its Twitter account and censored by the social media giant — a senior FBI official confirmed the contents of the laptop were genuine to Twitter officials.

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As the Post noted, that was “the first article in its bombshell reporting series on documents linking President Biden to his son’s foreign business deals” — among them Burisma.

So, all in all, a bad day — and to hear Hunter Biden tell it, he’s pretty much broke now, having assumedly squandered what he made on drugs, late taxes and sex workers.

But at least he’s broke in style, if the Post’s reporting is correct.

Should Hunter Biden go to jail?

According to the first son’s favorite Gotham-area paper, Hunter “was spotted Thursday enjoying a lavish lunch at Malibu hotspot Nobu as news swarmed of the newly unveiled bombshell FBI informant file describing a $10 million bribery allegation against him and his presidential father.” (Subscribe to The Western Journal to read our full breakdown of the document in its entirety.)

“The scandal-riddled first son appeared unbothered leaving the swanky beachside spot that’s co-owned by Robert De Niro — and Japanese A5 Wagyu sells for $38 an ounce, king crab tempura goes for $58 and a lobster shiitake salad will set diners back $72,” the report said.

“Biden hid behind a pair of aviators and a camouflage baseball cap bearing the emblem from the California state flag,” it said.

Well, one understands the need for indulgences when one is having a bad day — but perhaps a chocolate bar might have done better than, say, eating at one of Malibu’s most famous restaurants.

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This is especially true given 1) the price of what’s on the menu and 2) another one of Hunter’s scandals, this one relating to how much child support he pays.

As you may know, Hunter Biden is the rather unwilling father of a child named Navy Joan Roberts, born in 2018. He very reluctantly submitted to a DNA test that proved he was the father and later claimed in his autobiography that he was so far gone on drugs he didn’t even remember the sexual encounter that led to her siring.

The president has refused to refer to Navy Joan as his grandchild on occasion after occasion — which is better than Hunter, who acknowledges her only because a court and genetic testing force him to do so, and whose upbringing he would like to pay as little as possible into.

In September 2022, Hunter asked a court in Arkansas to reduce his monthly payments to Lunden Roberts, 4-year-old Navy Joan’s mother, citing a “substantial material change” in his financial situation.

Instead, the judge insisted he submit tax information to the court, including the money he’s earned from his ludicrous new gig as a painter.

“The ability to redact is being somewhat abused,” Independence County Circuit Judge Holly Meyer said during a May hearing. “This cryptic hide-the-ball game isn’t going to cut it when we get to trial.”

Nor, indeed, is this the first time he’s pleaded poverty: “I am unemployed and have had no monthly income since May 2019,” Hunter claimed via a November 2019 court filing, also citing “significant debts” as a factor that should be used to determine the child support.

However, at the very least, “broke” Hunter gets by with a little help from his friends.

Later in May, the Post reported that he’d been flown to Arkansas via a private jet owned by Hollywood billionaire Kevin Morris: “The 7,326-mile round trip likely cost between $55,000 to $117,000 all in — or the value of up to six months in child-support payments to Hunter Biden’s baby mama,” an aviation expert told the paper.

If that money had simply gone to the mom and he’d taken JetBlue like the rest of us, this wouldn’t be an issue — but no, of course he was flying private.

So, how many pairs of shoes or sets of baby clothes could a lunch at Nobu buy a kid?

I know it was a pretty bad Thursday for the first son, and I hate to be a bother; I’m merely asking on behalf of a 4-year-old whom Hunter Biden has never met and his father won’t even acknowledge.

Maybe if she’d been named “Burisma” instead of “Navy Jean,” she’d have gotten the Bidens’ attention.

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C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




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