Share
Commentary

California Sets the Stage for Election Integrity Nightmare as It Allows Voters to Print Ballots at Home

Share

Recent polls showing Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom losing ground in the upcoming recall election apparently have Democrats in the state running scared.

Ahead of the Sept. 14 vote, the California Secretary of State’s office has authorized the use of Remote Accessible Vote by Mail, a system that will allow Californians to download ballots and cast their votes “independently and privately in the comfort of their own home.”

In the site’s “Q and A” section, it clearly states that “This IS NOT internet voting.” I suppose they can say that because the ballot must be returned by mail or dropped off at a voting location.

What could possibly go wrong?

This method could make it even easier to commit voter fraud and may be the Democrats’ most brazen, transparent attempt yet to rig an election.

Trending:
Shock as Biden Boots Legendary Lee Greenwood from National Council on the Arts, Introduces His Own Nominees

The Secretary of State’s website lists the steps a voter must take to cast their ballot:

  • Download the application
  • Mark their selections
  • Print their selections
  • Sign the envelope (using the envelope provided with the vote-by-mail ballot or the voter’s own envelope)
  • Return the printed and signed selections either by mail or by dropping it off at a voting location. The selections cannot be returned electronically.

The RAVBM system was originally designed to make it easier for disabled individuals to vote. Due to the pandemic, all registered voters could request to use it for the 2020 election.

It worked out so well in November, and since Gov. Newsom is falling behind in his bid to keep his job, the state will reportedly use it again.

Does the ability for voters to print their own ballots at home concern you?

Democrats always find a way to make “emergency measures” more permanent if they benefit them.

In the meantime, the state legislature just passed Senate Bill 29, which requires a mail-in ballot to be sent to every registered voter, regardless of whether one has been requested.

The Election Integrity Project California is a nonpartisan nonprofit group that fights for fair, transparent and honest elections.

An EIPCa audit of ballots mailed out by the state ahead of the 2020 election has them concerned. The group found thousands of ballots were sent to individuals whom they believe (or have definitively determined) to be deceased and to an even larger number of voters whom they suspect have left the state.

A list of these questionable mail-in ballots by Congressional district can be viewed here.

Related:
As California Goes to Pot, Gov. Newsom Signs Woke Legislation to Remove 1 Word from State Laws

EIPCa President Linda Paine sent a letter to California Secretary of State Shirley Weber in June to present the results of their analysis.

“Based on its analysis of the VoteCal voter registration and voting history files of February 9, 2021, Election Integrity Project® California, Inc. (EIPCa) submits the following findings,” Paine wrote.

“This analysis exposed over 7,700 registrants each of whom have two votes credited to their Registration ID number in the November 2020 election and almost 124,000 more votes counted than voters with histories for that election. There are also more than 1.8 million ineligible registrants in the state. Finally, EIPCa identified over 108,000 who have had their out-of-country or out-of-state birthplaces inexplicably changed to California or United States by the on-line or DMV voter registration systems.”

Paine went on to detail the anomalies the audit uncovered.

It’s unclear if the Secretary of State’s office responded to the missive.

At any rate, Democrats previously thought Newsom would likely survive the recall vote. However, recent polls seem to have shaken their confidence.

The first question on the recall ballot asks residents if they believe the governor should be recalled.

A SurveyUSA poll released last week showed that only 40 percent of respondents wanted Newsom to remain in office while 51 percent favored recalling him. The poll was conducted between Aug. 2 and Aug. 4 online and surveyed 1,100 adults, with an unspecified margin of error.

The second question asks voters to choose a replacement candidate.

The SurveyUSA poll found 27 percent of respondents chose Democrat Kevin Paffrath, a YouTuber and real estate broker.

In second place was Republican talk show host and Fox News contributor Larry Elder with 23 percent. Although he was a late entrant into the race, he has gained strength quickly and it’s quite possible this momentum could thrust him to the top.

“Elder runs strongly among older voters, among Republicans and conservatives, and leads among independents 27% to 19%. Elder leads 2:1 in the Inland Empire and by 30 points in rural CA,” according to the pollster.

Is it any wonder the Democrats have seemingly found a way to stack the deck? The RAVBM system was created for moments like this.

If the polls keep moving away from Newsom, or God forbid, Paffrath, Californians will notice a distant clicking sound that keeps growing louder. They should not be alarmed. It’s just the sound of thousands of home printers churning out mail-in ballots.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



loading

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , ,
Share
Elizabeth is a contract writer at The Western Journal. Her articles have appeared on many conservative websites including RedState, Newsmax, The Federalist, Bongino.com, HotAir, Australian National Review, Independent Journal Review, Instapundit, MSN and RealClearPolitics. Please follow Elizabeth on Twitter.
Elizabeth is a contract writer at The Western Journal. Her articles have appeared on many conservative websites including RedState, Newsmax, The Federalist, Bongino.com, Australian National Review, HotAir, Independent Journal Review, Instapundit, MSN and RealClearPolitics.
Please follow Elizabeth on Twitter.




loading

Conversation