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Dick Morris: Mueller Hid Uranium Scandal to Help Hillary

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In the spring of 2016, as the election approached, attention was increasingly focused on Russia’s ambition to control America’s uranium supply. Peter Schweizer’s book “Clinton Cash” exposed the fact that, as secretary of state, Hillary Clinton had voted to allow Moscow to buy a company that controlled one-fifth of our uranium. When Schweizer coupled his revelation with the fact that Vladimir Putin had paid a $500,000 speaking fee Putin to Bill Clinton a few weeks before the vote, the deal started to attract attention.

The New York Times, given an advance copy of Schweitzer’s book, ran the uranium story as its lead article, front page, above the fold. Hillary could not afford to have the media publicize the Russian spy plot to bribe their way into control of uranium. It would have cast Hillary’s vote in a very bad light. Yet the fact is that right around the time that Hillary voted to sell our uranium, the FBI closed in on a spy ring of up to a dozen Russian agents who had been bribing uranium and transportation companies to aid in giving Moscow leverage.

(The operations of these spies formed the factual basis for the TV series “The Amerikans,” about Russian spies planted for years and even decades in the U.S. and trained to act like ordinary Americans).

Led by Vadim Mikerin, a former nuclear official of Russia’s state-run enterprise Rosatom, the spies sought to worm their way into positions of power to influence US officials — particularly Hillary — to OK the sale of uranium mines to Russia. An FBI informant who infiltrated the plot alerted the Bureau in 2010. National Review reports that Justice “had a prosecutable case against Mikerin by early 2010 (for) the extortion racket against American energy companies.”

But the FBI and the Justice Department dared not indict the spies. As National Review wrote: “clearly, in this atmosphere, disclosure of the racketeering enterprise that Rosatom’s American subsidiary was, at that very moment, carrying out would have been the death knell of the (uranium) asset transfer to Russia.” It would also have put Hillary’s approval of the uranium scale — and the speaking fee to to Bill — into a sharply negative perspective.

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So nobody told the Committee on Foreign Investments in the United States on which Hillary sat of the Russian spy ring. And, in ignorance, in October, 2010, CIFUS approved the sale.

Robert Mueller, the head of the FBI, and Eric Holder, the attorney general the Justice Department, sat on the case and permitted no publicity.  Where normally, breaking such a spy ring would have called for victory laps, perp walks and congratulatory media events, there was no public disclosure coming from Holder, Clinton or then-President Barack Obama.

It was not until the summer of 2014 — when the statute of limitations was about to lapse — that the spies were even arrested.

Meanwhile, in 2014, Russia had invaded Ukraine, making a mockery of the “reset” with Russia that Obama and Hillary had been trumpeting. To have a revelation at this point of the administration’s failure to arrest Russian spies, identified four years earlier and scheming to take over our uranium supply, all hell would have broken lose. With Hillary’s vote on CIFUS in the background, the publicity would have been a disaster.

So Mikerin and his cronies were arrested quietly without fanfare and pleaded guilty just before Labor Day, 2014. They were sentenced, again without publicity, right before Christmas.

The spies were originally charged with extortion, fraud and money laundering, but Justice Department prosecutor Rod Rosenstein (the same man who appointed Bob Mueller to be special prosecutor) let Mikrin plead guilty to a single count of “an agreement to commit a crime against the U.S.” that carried a sentence of zero to five years, a fraction of what a money laundering charge would have brought. And the plea deal avoided any mention of any crimes dating back to 2009 or 2010, the period before the CIFUS decision came down. Mikron got a sentence of four years.

In addition to Rosenstein, the deal was negotiated by Andrew Weissmann, now one of Mueller’s top prosecutors in his office (back then he ran the Justice Department’s Fraud Bureau).

So the unholy trio — Mueller, Rosenstein and Weissmann —  that now prosecutes President Donald Trump was back then shielding Hillary Clinton from a massive national backlash over her and Bill’s sellout to Moscow.

To be sure no word leaked out, the informant who uncovered the spy ring was ordered to remain silent by the higher-ups at Justice. Now, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has released William Campbell from this order and we await his testimony before Congress.

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Very bad news for Hillary.

Dick Morris is a former adviser to President Bill Clinton as well as a political author, pollster and consultant. His most recent book, Rogue Spooks, was written with his wife, Eileen McGann.

The views expressed in this opinion article are those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by the owners of this website. If you are interested in contributing an Op-Ed to The Western Journal, you can learn about our submission guidelines and process here.

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Dick Morris is a former adviser to President Bill Clinton as well as a political author, pollster and consultant. His most recent book, "50 Shades of Politics," was written with his wife, Eileen McGann.




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