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Disney Criticized After Removing a Main Character from 'Mulan' Remake for Political Correctness Reasons

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The live-action remake of the Disney hit “Mulan” is already drawing fire for its decision to wipe out one of the animated film’s lead characters as a nod to political correctness.

“Mulan” is the story of a woman who disguises herself as a man to fight in place of her father in China’s imperial army. The animated 1998 version was a major hit for Disney, which filmed a live-action remake that hits theaters on March 27.

However, the remake will not include the character of Li Shang. In the animated film, Li Shang is a captain in the army who is Mulan’s mentor while she is in the guise of a man and later becomes her love interest, according to Global News.

“We split Li Shang into two characters. One became Commander Tung who serves as her surrogate father and mentor in the course of the movie. The other is Honghui who is her equal in the squad,” producer Jason Reed said, according to Yahoo News.

The reason had nothing to do with the plot and everything to do with political correctness, he said.

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“I think particularly in the time of the #MeToo movement, having a commanding officer that is also the sexual love interest was very uncomfortable and we didn’t think it was appropriate. And we thought that in a lot of ways that it was sort of justifying behavior of we’re doing everything we can to get out of our industry,” he said, according to Collider.

In Reed’s eyes, this solved everything.

“There’s no power dynamic between them but there is the same dynamic in the original movie that was with Li Shang,” he said.

Reed said the characters are equals.

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“They start off on the wrong foot, really. As they progress through the training together, they kind of have this unspoken bond about it because they recognize each other’s warrior spirit. That’s how they kind of build their friendship up to begin with, through the training and acknowledging each other,” Reed said, according to Collider.

The decision did not play well on Twitter.

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Reed said that Chinese sensibilities were also a factor in making the movie.

“The traditional Disney audience and the diaspora Asian audience viewed the movie in one way, and the traditional Chinese in China audience viewed a slightly different way. So we really dug in to try and make sure that we were addressing both of those audiences in a thoughtful way.  And I think that we — I hope, knock on wood — I think we found a way to tie the way they look at the movie together,” Reed said.

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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