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Former MLB All-Star and World Series Champ Tony Fernandez Dead at Age 57

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Former All-Star shortstop Tony Fernandez died Sunday after he was taken off life support in a Florida hospital.

He had been in a medically induced coma, said Imrad Hallim, the director and co-founder of the Tony Fernandez Foundation.

Hallim said the former MLB star was surrounded by family as he died.

Fernandez was ill with kidney disease for years and waiting for a transplant.

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Fernandez, 57, was a five-time All-Star during his 17 seasons in the major leagues and helped the Toronto Blue Jays win the 1993 World Series.

He won four straight Gold Gloves with the Blue Jays in the 1980s and holds club records for career hits and games played.

A clutch hitter in five trips to the postseason, he had four separate stints with Toronto and played for six other teams.

He was a .288 hitter with 94 homers and 844 RBIs in 2,158 big league games that went through 2001.

Former teammates of Fernandez shared their condolences over the news of his death:

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The Toronto Blue Jays released the following statement:

“The Toronto Blue Jays are deeply saddened by the passing of Tony Fernandez today, one of our club’s most celebrated and respected players. Enshrined forever in Blue Jays history on the Level of Excellence, Tony left an equally indelible mark in the hearts of a generation of Blue Jays fans during his 12 unforgettable seasons with the team. His impact on the baseball community in Toronto and across Canada is immeasurable. Our deepest condolences are with the Fernandez family during this time.”

After he retired from baseball, Fernandez became an ordained minister and the Tony Fernandez Foundation was established to assist underprivileged and troubled children, according to its website.

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

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