Commentary

Huckabee Blows the Lid off McCabe Firing With Brutal Truth Behind His Exit

Combined Shape

Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe’s firing has brought out a predictable round of liberal condemnation. It’s been compared to the firing of James Comey or to Richard Nixon’s infamous Saturday Night Massacre.

In terms of Comey’s firing, yes, there are some similarities, although not really the ones that liberals might like to draw attention to. Both, for instance, probably should have been fired. Both liked leaking to the media, and neither should have.

There were also differences, like the fact that Comey served at the pleasure of the president and the president was no longer pleased with him, whereas the FBI’s Office of Professional Responsibility — an independent group of law enforcement veterans not appointed by the Trump administration — recommended McCabe’s firing for the aforementioned leaking to the media and his lack of candor with investigators.

As for the Nixon comparisons, I can only assume it has something to do with pot being legal in more states.

However specious the outcry may be, it’s still there. And former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee has a brutal message for those doing the crying: “Get over it.”

Trending:
CDC Quietly Changes Major Part of 'How COVID-19 Spreads' Page, Adds Advice That Millions Didn't Get When Trump Was in Office

In an appearance on Fox Business Network on Thursday, Huckabee said it was “just remarkable” that there were so many liberals hitching their hopes of making something stick to the Trump administration on the McCabe firing.

“For all of the people who are just crying big crocodile tears because Andrew McCabe, my gosh, get over it,” Huckabee said.

“Andrew McCabe deserved to be fired according to the Office of Professional Responsibility. It wasn’t Donald Trump who fired him, it was his own FBI organization who said he had to go.”

Do you think Andrew McCabe should have been fired?

As for those who said he should have just been allowed to retire — which he was set to do with a full pension 26 hours after the firing — Huckabee attacked that idea, too.

“Why should he get a pension if he violated the basic fundamental code of ethics he supposedly clearly understood?” Huckabee asked.

McCabe was forced out of the FBI just before his retirement due to a report from the Office of Professional Responsibility.

It stated that he had improperly talked to the media to influence the narrative on the FBI’s investigation of the Clinton Foundation and that he lacked candor when talking to officials about the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s email server, including while under oath.

These are both fireable offenses; McCabe has claimed he had the authority to talk to the Wall Street Journal reporter in his role as FBI deputy director. The OPR disagreed.

Related:
NYT Report: Biden's Folksy Charade Covers Up Short Temper, Frequent Outbursts of Profanity

As for the “lack of candor” — an equally serious charge in the world of the FBI, where you’re expected to be fully upfront with internal sources at all times, especially under oath — McCabe really hasn’t had a response for this yet, other than “Trump done did it, and he’s coming for us all.” Surprisingly, this line has mostly been believed.

No doubt there will be more information forthcoming about the McCabe case, and we’ll be able to judge the merits of the firing then. Until that point, it’s time for the other side of the aisle to stop screaming like a stuck hippopotamus about a firing that, from all appearances, was totally warranted. That’s the brutal truth, and no amount of febrile rhetoric will change that fact.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →






We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , ,
Combined Shape
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




Conversation