Commentary

Huckabee Tweets Epic Video of Man Trying To Steal Electrified Trump Sign

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Whether or not it’s real, a video of a man trying to steal an electrified Trump sign has a lot of people angry — mostly because of who shared it on social media.

It began when Trump social media director Dan Scavino shared a video loop of a man apparently trying to steal the electrified sign and getting a shock.

It then got shared by former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee — the father of former White House press secretary Sarah Sanders — and things went apace from there.

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First, the tweet from Scavino, which began with an electric bolt emoji.

“When this guy with Trump Derangement Syndrome went to steal a #TrumpPence campaign sign there was one problem, it was electrified….” he tweeted on Thursday morning.

Huckabee retweeted it with the suggestion that the man could be an early contender for the 2020 Darwin Awards.

For the uninitiated, the Darwin Awards is an ironic online “honor” given to “salute the improvement of the human genome by honoring those who accidentally remove themselves from it in a spectacular manner,” according to the awards’ website.

It’s not clear that this happened in 2020; indeed, there were more than a few people online who noted that this looked suspiciously close to a video that circulated in 2016. (I certainly remember seeing this one before.) It also seems unusual that if the sign wasn’t taken, the homeowner would have trawled through hours of video footage simply to find this clip.

I don’t want to cast aspersions on whoever originally uploaded the clip, but when it comes to judging whether it’s real, just keep those things in mind.

It’s also worth noting there were plenty of people who stole Trump signs during the 2016 election cycle and beyond, so it’s not as if this is entirely outside the realm of reality.

This all said, there were plenty of people with blue checkmarks who did take this seriously — and to say the clip was polarizing could be the understatement of the (admittedly very young) year.

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Here was liberal pundit Dean Obeidallah saying that this was nothing short of “calling for violence against those who oppose Trump”:

From the right, Brad Polumbo of the Washington Examiner was slightly more restrained:

Jeryl Bier, formerly of The Weekly Standard, had similar thoughts:

Caleb Howe of Mediaite had a different take:

There were plenty of non-blue-checkmarkers opining on it, although sometimes their hot takes make you understand why there are social media gatekeepers, sadly:

Ah, unintentional humor.

Several things here.

Do you see anything wrong with electrifying a yard sign to deter thieves?

First, all apologies to Huckabee, but I think his jeans are just dark.

Second, if the video is real, I think we all know what happens when you play stupid games — you win stupid prizes.

There was plenty of sign-stealing during the 2016 election, almost all of the high-profile incidents involving Trump signs. Electrification was one of the methods used by Trump sign owners, as shown during this 2016 report from CNN:

That’s likely to repeat itself during the 2020 campaign, which promises to be even nastier than Trump’s first rodeo.

This isn’t going to be the last time we have a debate over Donald Trump’s campaign signs and the methods people use to protect them. The same thing is probably true for the signs representing whoever the Democrat nominee is.

If only there were a way to avoid getting shamed for sign-stealing. Well, I certainly can’t think of any.

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C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal for four years.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal for four years. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




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