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After Innocent Man Mauled by Bear, Lib Animal Rights Crowd Calls for His Death

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Are animals more important than humans? You would think that if you had to make a choice between the two, it would be a pretty easy one.

For animal rights activists, however, it’s not so simple.

In an incident that could be called “Harambe II,” a hunter who was mauled by a grizzly bear received heaps of online hate, including calls for his death, after he posted his story online.

According to the Helena (Montana) Independent Record, Idaho resident Bob Legasa was mauled during a recent hunting trip.

“Legasa was attacked by a mother grizzly bear Oct. 13 while bowhunting for elk in Montana. As he and his partner walked through tall sagebrush – between 6 and 8 feet – they startled a grizzly bear cub and its mother,” the Independent Record reported.

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“The mother bear charged Legasa. His hunting partner, Greg Gibson, of Sandpoint, Idaho, sprayed them both with bear spray, but not before the bear tackled Legasa.

“The bear grabbed Legasa’s arm with her mouth and clawed at his face. But the bear spray deployed by Gibson drove the animal away.”

Legasa, who owns an outdoor media company, decided to post about the incident online. That’s when an English animal rights group got hold of his story and proved yet again that to the PETA crowd, the only animal that doesn’t have intrinsic value is Homo sapiens.

“I have never been so threatened in my life,” Legasa told the Independent Record.

“There are literally hundreds of threats wishing that I would die. Wishing that I would die a slow, painful death. It came, from all people, the peaceful grass-eating vegan community.”

Sadly, that’s not an exaggeration.

“Karma. Can you post your address so that someone can finish the job and feed the remains to the bears in winter,” one user wrote, the Independent Record reported.

“Come on guys, don’t be so mean. This is incredibly tragic,” another user wrote. “Tragic that Momma Bear didn’t get a chance to finish the job of taking out the trash.”

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“Bet you’re not the apex predator you thought you were. Let’s hope the next time the bear finished what it started,” yet another wrote, the Independent Record reported.

Those three commenters didn’t respond to interview requests, the Independent Record reported.

Even the “nice” comments from those opposed to hunting seem frightfully out of touch.

“Glad you’re okay. I’m hoping maybe this changes your heart and you give up hunting innocent animals,” another user wrote. “They want to live just like we do and their fight for survival is just as strong as ours. If you don’t have to hunt out of necessity, you shouldn’t be hunting for sport.”

That last user — an American named Dawn Yonce — was willing to be interviewed by the Independent Record. She told the newspaper she find Legasa’s post on a Facebook page called Justice For Cecil the Lion.

She told the Indpendent Record, “if you’re not starving, you shouldn’t be killing wild animals for food and most definitely, not for trophy.”

At least she wasn’t calling for Legasa’s death. Those other commenters are a different story.

If you don’t agree with hunting, that’s one thing, but using a near-death experience to “educate” someone about your beliefs is so profoundly insensitive that the mind boggles. How do even the most zealous activists justify this sort of nonsense to themselves?

“Their outrage is insane,” Sportsmen Alliance vice president of marketing and communication Brian Lynn told the Independent Record. “It’s so contradictory to what they say they stand for.”

“You put this in to any other context, the people doing this would be called out, shut down, treated as hate speech,” he added.

And in that Lynn 100 percent correct. When Legasa survived that bear attack, he was breaking the laws of neither God nor man. He was as innocent as the natural world he was a part of, engaging in an activity literally as old as humanity.

But those kinds of facts aren’t important to the animal rights crowd. Nature has effectively become their idol. We’ve seen a multitude of cases — Cecil the Lion, the aforementioned Harambe — in which animal rights activists have evinced more feeling for animals than they have for humans.

And make no mistake: This fits the biblical definition of idolatry. To cite Romans 1, “They exchanged the truth about God for a lie, and worshiped and served created things rather than the Creator.” If you believe that grizzly bears deserve to kill a human hunter, you’ve become the embodiment of that verse.

At least Legasa told the Independent Record that he didn’t feel physically threatened, particularly since most of the remarks came from overseas. However, he said the hate “was wearing me down.”

“It’s out of hand with what social media can do to devastate or uproot someone’s life,” he said.

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C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




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