Commentary

James Woods Uses Old American Photo To Remind Americans What 70% Tax Rates Really Look Like

Combined Shape

Do you remember what a 70 percent top tax rate entailed? Neither do I. I was born in the last months of the Carter presidency, and while I’ve certainly read about the effects his policies had, I didn’t experience them firsthand.

If Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has her way, however, we might all be going back to those days. See, among the brilliant plans devised by the freshman congresswoman from the Bronx (who has remained ever eager to remind you that she is, in fact, from the Bronx) is to increase the top tax rate to 70 percent.

Ocasio-Cortez, as you may have heard, has been pushing her “Green New Deal,” which would essentially turn the government into a sort of Randian nightmare where central planning would eliminate our dependence on fossil fuels. She also wants to do this in 12 years, which makes the moon shot look like a piece of cake.

But where would the money for this come? Ocasio-Cortez suggested a tax rate of 60 to 70 percent on the top earners, according to Politico.

“What is the problem with trying to push our technological capacities to the furthest extent possible?” Ocasio-Cortez said during an appearance on “60 Minutes.”

Trending:
CNN's Don Lemon Fails to Get Guest to Take 'Bait,' Instead Gets Contradicted on Slavery

“There’s an element where yeah, people are going to have to start paying their fair share in taxes.”

When Anderson Cooper called this “radical,” Ocasio-Cortez approved of this.

“I think that it only has ever been radicals that have changed this country,” Ocasio-Cortez said. “Yeah, if that’s what radical means, call me a radical.”

Except, as James Woods notes, it’s not really radical to go back to 1979:

Do you think that the "Green New Deal" is a good idea?

Now, granted, the Iranian revolution was what caused the 1979-1980 oil shock, but this was emblematic of Carter’s policies. If you look at the administration holistically, it made sense.

For instance, Carter’s foreign policy was profoundly weak, one of the reasons why the Iranian revolution had such a profound impact on Americans. He’ll also forever be connected with the “misery index,” an economic indicator that was amazingly high under his administration — in no small part due to tax policy.

Oh yes, and “malaise.” Don’t forget malaise.

Related:
Report: Biden Supposedly Cost Taxpayers Billions to House Unaccompanied Minors

High taxes didn’t help then and they won’t help now. This is especially true when you consider the people who earn the kind of money Ocasio-Cortez wants to be taxing have incredible monetary mobility. That could mean by the time she gets around to taxing the 70 percent that she wants to, that money has long been burrowed away somewhere else.

And that’s not inconsequential. Consider data from the Tax Foundation, which found “(t)he top 1 percent paid a greater share of individual income taxes (39.0 percent) than the bottom 90 percent combined (29.4 percent).”

Then you look at the “Green New Deal,” which is really more a bunch of rhetoric than a plan. Once we mobilize the American economy for the purposes of eliminating carbon-based fuels within 12 years, as she wants to, what’s going to happen is systematic imbalances even greater than the Iranian revolution could provide.

Thus, if you thought that gas lines were bad before, wait until you see what Ocasio-Cortez wants to do. She’s no radical — at least, not unless you consider Jimmy Carter a radical.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →






We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , , , , , ,
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal for four years.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal for four years. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




Conversation