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Mom Shares Grave Warning About Toxic Flower After Daughter Develops Terrifying Symptoms

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Warnings for parents are a common occurrence on social media these days. Moms and dads warn other parents about common items around the house and yard that could be dangerous or even deadly.

From scented candles to water balloons, warning posts are put out in hopes other parents will practice caution so they can avoid the fate others have encountered.

A recent post on Shared reported one mom’s frightening encounter with an innocent-looking plant known as the moonflower.

According to Shared, Texas mom Ashley Medeiros posted a warning on Facebook along with a photo of her daughter Pyper.

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“Just a warning!” Medeiros’ post read. “If you have a moonflower plant do not let your kids near it.”

While her original post is no longer available, the warning isn’t any less important. Apparently, the moonflower can be extremely harmful.

Medeiros showed a photo of her daughter with a blown-out pupil in one eye and a pinned pupil in the other.

Have you ever heard about the effects of this toxic flower?

Her daughter Pyper had been playing with some seemingly harmless flowers.

“Very scary to see,” the mom wrote.

“It also causes hallucinations, abdominal complications, cardiac arrhythmias,” she went on. “So dig them up or keep them away from your kids!”

This isn’t the first time someone has been affected by this plant, also known as “devil’s weed.” In 2008, The Denver Post reported a case involving five teenagers.

According to the news outlet, the flower has to be ingested for it to have a toxic effect. “The seeds, leaves and roots — when eaten, smoked or brewed into a tea – cause hallucinations and other medical problems,” The Denver Post explained.

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In 2002, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported a case in which 14 teenagers from Ohio fell ill after ingesting moonflower seeds and tea.

This stuff is serious for sure, but doesn’t appear to be an issue unless you actually eat the toxic plant.

For families with young children and even pets, it’s probably a good idea to steer clear of having this plant in your yard.

Other common names for the “moonflower” or “devil’s weed” include “devil’s trumpet,” “jimsonweed,” and “thorn apple.”

Better Homes and Gardens gave a warning about the plant, too. “As beautiful as this plant may be, it is deadly if ingested. When planting moonflowers, site them in a spot out of reach of children and pets.”

So the moral of the story is clear: Don’t eat moonflowers or let your kids near them. While lovely to look at, they can cause serious issues for anyone who decides to turn this plant into a snack.

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Sarah Carri is an avid reader and social media guru with a passion for truth and life. Her writing has previously been published in print and online by Focus on the Family and other well known media outlets. Her experience in ministry and Disney entertainment gives her a unique perspective on such topics.
Sarah Carri is an avid reader and social media guru with a passion for truth and life. Her writing has previously been published in print and online by Focus on the Family and other well known media outlets. Her experience in ministry and Disney entertainment gives her a unique perspective on such topics.

Sarah's experience as a successful working stay-at-home mom and business owner has given her the chance to write and research often. She stays up to date on the latest in entertainment and offers her views on celebrity stories based on her wide knowledge of the industry. Her success as a former preschool teacher and licensed daycare provider lend to her know-how on topics relating to parenting and childhood education.

Her thoughts on faith and family issues stem from home life and ministry work. Sarah takes time to attend workshops and classes annually that help her to improve and hone her writing craft. She is a graduate of the Institute of Children's Literature program and her writing has been acclaimed by ACFW and ECPA.
Education
Institute of Children's Literature, Art Institute of Phoenix (Advertising), University of California Irvine (Theater), Snow College (Early Childhood Education)
Location
Arizona
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Entertainment, Faith




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