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Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Inductee, Star Fleetwood Mac Singer Dies at 79

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Christine McVie, the British-born Fleetwood Mac vocalist, songwriter and keyboard player whose cool, soulful contralto helped define such classics as “You Make Loving Fun,” “Everywhere” and “Don’t Stop,” has died at age 79.

Her death was announced Wednesday on the band’s social media accounts. Her family said in a statement posted to Instagram that the singer died following a “short illness.”

“She was truly one-of-a-kind, special and talented beyond measure,” the band’s statement reads in part.

McVie was a steady presence and personality in a band known for its frequent lineup changes and volatile personalities — notably fellow singer-songwriters Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham.

During its peak commercial years, from 1975 to ’80, the band sold tens of millions of records and transformed personal battles into melodic, compelling songs.

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McVie herself had been married to bassist John McVie, and their breakup — along with the split of Nicks and Buckingham — was famously documented on the 1977 release “Rumours,” among the bestselling albums of all time.

Fleetwood Mac, co-founded by drummer Mick Fleetwood in 1967, was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. The group’s many other hit singles included “Dreams,” “Go Your Own Way” and “Little Lies.”

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

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