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Singer Christopher Cross Has 'Come-to-Jesus' Moment After He Says COVID Left Him Temporarily Paralyzed

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Christopher Cross, a Grammy award-winning singer known for songs like “Sailing” and “Ride Like The Wind,” has had a shocking year after contracting the coronavirus and dealing with some unexpected side effects.

After traveling to Mexico City earlier this year, he and his girlfriend tested positive for COVID-19, according to CBS News.

After going through three weeks of sickness, Cross was finally feeling well enough to go to the grocery store. When he got home, though, his legs collapsed and he realized he had something else to contend with.

Cross was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre Syndrome, which is a condition where the body attacks the nerves. It takes at least a year for victims to recover, though regaining their full faculties can take much longer.

Cross experienced paralysis at first, which turned to using a wheelchair and then walking with a cane.

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Doctors believe this condition has been brought on by COVID, according to CBS.

“Many of you have asked for an update, so I’m sharing more of my journey in today’s post,” Cross shared on Facebook at the end of July. “It’s been a very difficult recovery, but made better by your well-wishes and kind thoughts.”

He shared a post in which he detailed how difficult it had been to be diagnosed with GBS and work through paralysis, fighting to regain control of his limbs.

“To be honest, I get frustrated and depressed about it all,” he wrote. “That being said, I realize I am lucky to have survived COVID-19 and be on the mend from GBS. Most of all, I am blessed to have the love and support of many people.”

Now, months later, he has more reflections to share, thanks to an interview that aired Sunday with “CBS Sunday Morning.”

“There was some, you know, come-to-Jesus moments or whatever, where I was looking for any help I could get … to get out of this thing, because I wasn’t sure,” Cross said.

“It was the worst 10 days of my life,” he said. And I couldn’t walk, could barely move. And so, it was certainly the darkest of times for me, you know? It really was touch-and-go, and tough.”

While Cross initially feared that he would never be able to perform again, he is making strides toward recovery and hopes to be back to himself within a year.

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“So yeah, my walking is affected,” he said. “My speech at times can be affected. Memory is a big deal, too. Just neurologically, I’m kind of a little foggy, you know?”

“Now I’m on medication … a nerve pain medication, which also can cause some fogginess. But until I can get off it at some point, I won’t know how clear I would be,” Cross added.

“But most people with Guillain-Barre heal about 90% to 100% over about a year. That’s what my prognosis is.”

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Amanda holds an MA in Rhetoric and TESOL from Cal Poly Pomona. After teaching composition and logic for several years, she's strayed into writing full-time and especially enjoys animal-related topics.
As of January 2019, Amanda has written over 1,000 stories for The Western Journal but doesn't really know how. Graduating from California State Polytechnic University with a MA in Rhetoric/Composition and TESOL, she wrote her thesis about metacognitive development and the skill transfer between reading and writing in freshman students.
She has a slew of interests that keep her busy, including trying out new recipes, enjoying nature, discussing ridiculous topics, reading, drawing, people watching, developing curriculum, and writing bios. Sometimes she has red hair, sometimes she has brown hair, sometimes she's had teal hair.
With a book on productive communication strategies in the works, Amanda is also writing and illustrating some children's books with her husband, Edward.
Location
Austin, Texas
Languages Spoken
English und ein bißchen Deutsch
Topics of Expertise
Faith, Animals, Cooking




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