Student Dares Stand Up And Tell Walkout Protesters What They Should Really Be Doing

Students across the U.S. walked out of school Wednesday for a nationwide demonstration in memory of the 17 students and faculty killed one month earlier in a mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

While many of the young activists pointed to gun control as a response to continued acts of school violence, some offered alternative or additional steps in pursuit of the same goal.

One student in Washington state expressed her desire to see peers embrace kindness and acceptance, shunning the culture of bullying she believes contributes to the deadly behavior of school shooters.

As iFIBER One News reported, Angelica Mansfield was the only student from a group of about 200 at Moses Lake High School to address the entire local group during this week’s walkout.

MLHS Walkout

About 200 Moses Lake High School students gathered Wednesday morning in the school courtyard as part of nationwide school walkouts.Angelica Mansfield, who was the only student who addressed the entire group, had a message for her fellow classmates.

Posted by iFIBER ONE News on Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Trending:
Watch Furious Mom's Epic Response to School Teaching Children About Anal Sex

In her fiery statement, she chided other students for failing to similarly turn their outrage into action, as reported by KING.

“Before we just stand here for 17 minutes and don’t do nothing, because that’s what we’re going to do right now, I just wanted to say, like, we’re out there for a shooting — school shootings — you guys are all at a school, OK?” she said.

As Mansfield told her schoolmates, massacres like the one in Florida last month “are happening from these kids that you guys are cornering out, that you’re bullying, that you’re doing all this stuff to because you think it’s funny.”

She went on to insist that the issue of bullying is very serious and has led to deadly consequences.

Do you agree with this student's position?

“All of these kids just want to be themselves, they want to be who they want to be in their own school,” she said. “They’re here to learn. They’re not here to bully. Kids shouldn’t be shooting up schools; we’re teenagers.”

Instead of further belittling victims of bullying and those dealing with emotional issues, Mansfield challenged her peers to rise above that reaction to demonstrate empathy and friendship to kids who need it most.

“You should say that you love your neighbor,” she said. “You should be there for them, sit with them at lunch, tell them that you’re their friend, that you’re going to be there for them whenever they need you.”

Even if a personal struggle is not immediately obvious, Mansfield said everyone can benefit from such expressions of kindness.

“Just because they’re already dealing with bullying at school enough, and they have their own problems at home whether you know it or not,” she said. “Everybody does and I don’t know why it’s so hard to be nice and care and love each other. Like, it’s not hard.”

Related:
Why the Suburbs Are Safer: Strengthening Our Foundation, The American Family

The student acknowledged that some walkout participants would laugh at her for sharing her thoughts, but she remained undeterred.

“I don’t care, because somebody said something while we were out here,” she said. “Somebody stood up.”

Though she apologized for appearing mad and speaking “aggressively,” Mansfield did not shy away from her decision to speak out when given the opportunity.

“Most of you are out here because you don’t want to be in class,” she said. “That’s it. Like, it’s stupid.”

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



loading

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , , ,
Chris Agee is an American journalist with more than 15 years of experience in a wide range of newsrooms.
Chris Agee is an American journalist with more than 15 years of experience in a variety of newsroom settings. After covering crime and other beats for newspapers and radio stations across the U.S., he served as managing editor at Western Journalism until 2017. He has also been a regular guest and guest host on several syndicated radio programs. He lives in Phoenix, Arizona, with his wife and son.
Birthplace
Virginia
Nationality
American
Honors/Awards
Texas Press Association, Best News Writing - 2012
Education
Bachelor of Arts, Journalism - Averett University
Professional Memberships
Online News Association
Location
Arizona
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Entertainment




loading

Conversation