Commentary

A Year and a Half After His Bold Promise on Immigration, Trump Is Coming Through in a Huge Way

Combined Shape

Donald Trump is only a year and a half into his first term as president, but already a lot has changed.

One area in particular where we’ve seen a big shift? Immigration.

As detailed in the movie “Trump@War” — available exclusively until Sept. at The Western Journal — things were considerably different in the White House when it came to immigration before the 2016 election.

When there was anger of the killing of Kate Steinle by an illegal immigrant who had been deported multiple times, liberals told America that focusing on the crime was the result of racism.

Trump’s mounted a presidential campaign arguing differently — and millions of Americans agreed.

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“When Donald Trump took that escalator down at Trump Tower, as soon as he honed in on immigration, I knew that he was speaking to an America that had been told they weren’t allowed to talk about these issues,” Raheem Kassam, the Shillman Fellow at the Middle East Forum, says in “Trump@War.”

“They were verboten. They had to be censored in public discourse for the sake of social cohesion.

“Donald Trump was having none of it,” Kassam says. “Donald Trump stood on that stage and said some of the most extraordinary and true and revelatory things about mass migration.”

“I speak to border guards, and they tell us what we’re getting,” the man who would become president said at his campaign announcement in June 2015.

Do you think President Trump has made a difference on immigration?

“They’re sending us not the right people. It’s coming from more than Mexico. It’s coming from all over South and Latin America and it’s coming probably — probably — from the Middle East.”

The “big, beautiful wall” suddenly became a mantra for the campaign, much to the chagrin of an American left that didn’t think such things could — or should — be aired publicly.

“The notion of a wall at the southern border which had been proposed years before that the Senate had voted on, including Hillary … was now a controversial idea is absurd,” Corey Lewandowski, Trump’s first campaign manager, says in the film.

“When we went out to the American people and the president started talking about bringing our jobs back — under the Obama years, those jobs were decimated, and he promised to bring those manufacturing jobs back, because Middle America had been left behind.”

That’s when the left started laughing at Trump while hating on him at the same time.

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Then-President Barack Obama joked that Trump didn’t have a “magic wand” to bring jobs back. Liberal lawmakers and entertainers said the wall couldn’t be built — and if the project went forward, it was arrant racism.

And most of all, they said he could never win. On Nov. 8, 2016, that all changed. And in the early hours of Nov. 9, Trump became president-elect.

So, where are we now? The film notes that the “magic wand” seems to have worked. The rule of law has returned as a concept. And the “big, beautiful wall” is in the process of becoming reality.

Talk about a huge change in a year and a half. Most Americans have seen it happen through the lens of the mainstream media. “Trump@War” gives Trump supporters a chance to see it through the eyes of movie makers who are on their side for a change.

If you want to see more, you can see “Trump@War” for free by following this link.

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C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal for four years.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal for four years. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




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