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Arctic blast due to hit KC for AFC championship game

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KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Break out the parkas for Sunday night’s AFC title game at Arrowhead Stadium.

The National Weather Service is projecting an arctic blast to settle over Kansas City for the Chiefs’ game against the New England Patriots. Temperatures at kickoff could range from 10 degrees to well below zero, potentially making it the coldest game in Arrowhead Stadium history.

Twice it has been 1 degree at kickoff, including a December 2016 game against Tennessee.

Both teams are accustomed to cold, inclement weather, though.

The Chiefs experienced some of it this past weekend, when heavy snow blanketed Kansas City and knocked out power to thousands of people. The snow stopped just before kickoff, though, and the field was in good shape for their 31-13 victory over the Colts.

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The wind chill was in the teens for the Patriots’ win over the Los Angeles Chargers on Sunday.

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More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/tag/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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