Share
News

Longest-Running 2020 Democrat, John Delaney, Ends His Campaign

Share

John Delaney, the longest-running Democratic candidate in the 2020 presidential race, is ending his campaign after pouring millions of his own money into an effort that failed to resonate with voters.

The announcement, made Friday morning, further winnowed down a primary field that had once stood at more than two dozen.

“At this moment in time, this is not the purpose God has for me,” Delaney said in an interview with CNN. “We’ve clearly shaped the debate in a very positive way.”



The former Maryland congressman has been running for president since July 2017, though Delaney’s early start did little to give him an advantage in the race or raise his name recognition with Democratic primary voters.

Trending:
I Miss Melania: Jill Biden Unveils Horrible Christmas Decorations for White House

In a field dominated by well-known candidates from the liberal wing of the party, Delaney, 56, called for a moderate approach with “real solutions, not impossible promises,” and dubbed the progressive goal of “Medicare for All” to be “political suicide.”

Delaney last appeared on the Democratic debate stage in July 2019 but continued to campaign even as his presidential effort largely faded to gain traction.

Delaney joins other candidates, such as Montana Gov. Steve Bullock and former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, who unsuccessfully tried to woo moderate voters before ending their respective campaigns.

Campaign finance reports showed Delaney’s campaign was more than $10 million in debt largely because of loans Delaney made to his campaign.

At the end of September, months after he had last been on a debate stage, the former lawmaker had just over $548,000 in cash on hand.

Before billionaires Tom Steyer and Michael Bloomberg entered the presidential race and used their substantial wealth to gain attention, Delaney tried a similar approach.

Back in March, he promised to donate $2 to charity for every new donor who donated on his website.

Then in October, Delaney dangled “two club-level” World Series tickets, with hotel and airfare included, as a prize for those who donated to his campaign.

Related:
Iranian Hackers Pose as Conservatives, Send Dems Menacing Emails to Depict GOPers as Hateful Thugs
Do you agree with Delaney about Sanders and Warren?

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts were frequent targets of Delaney as he warned during the July debate that the “free everything” policy approach would alienate independents and ensure President Donald Trump’s reelection.

He compared the two senators to failed Democratic standard-bearers of the past, including George McGovern, Walter Mondale and Michael Dukakis.

Delaney renewed that criticism on his way out of the race, saying the true hope for the party lay in more moderate Democrats such as former Vice President Joe Biden and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar.

“People like Bernie Sanders who are running on throwing the whole U.S. economy out the window and starting from scratch … I just think that makes our job so much harder, in terms of beating Trump,” Delaney said Friday morning.

“I also think that’s not real governing,” he said. “That’s not responsible leadership because those things aren’t going to happen.”

Despite the criticisms, Delaney pledged to “campaign incredibly hard” for whoever won the Democratic nomination.

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , ,
Share
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation

The Western Journal is pleased to bring back comments to our articles! Due to threatened de-monetization by Big Tech, we had temporarily removed comments, but we have now implemented a solution to bring back the conversation that Big Tech doesn't want you to have. If you have any problems using the new commenting platform, please contact customer support at commenting-help@insticator.com. Welcome back!