News

DOJ Moves To Ban Potential National Security Threat Used by Nearly 20 Million Americans

Combined Shape

The Justice Department is seeking an immediate ban on downloads of WeChat in Apple and Google app stores, saying the Chinese-owned messaging service is a threat to the security of the United States.

Last week the U.S. Commerce Department moved to ban WeChat from U.S. app stores but on Saturday, Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler in California agreed to delay U.S. restrictions, saying they would affect users’ First Amendment rights.

In a filing on Friday, the Justice Department asked Beeler to allow for an immediate ban while the case works its way through court.

WeChat is a messaging app popular with many Chinese-speaking Americans. It’s owned by Chinese tech giant Tencent.

The Justice Department says WeChat allows the Chinese government to collect and use personal data on Americans to advance its own interests.

Trending:
Biden Cancels Trump's 'Garden of American Heroes' and Ends Exec Order Protecting Monuments

The filing states WeChat has approximately 19 million active daily users in the U.S.

The Justice Department argues that the U.S. will suffer irreparable harm if the court does not stay its decision.

The Trump administration has targeted another Chinese-owned app, TikTok, for national security and data privacy concerns amid rising tensions between Washington and Beijing.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →






We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , ,
Combined Shape
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation