Leading architects urge Israeli PM to cancel cable car plan

Combined Shape

JERUSALEM (AP) — A group of leading international architects is appealing to Israel’s government to halt its controversial plan to build a cable car to Jerusalem’s Old City.

Some 30 architects, including Spanish Santiago Calatrava, famed for designing Jerusalem’s Chords Bridge, celebrated American architect Thom Mayne and Israeli-born Moshe Safdie added their voices to public outcry against the project Sunday in a letter to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

It called the cable car a threat to Jerusalem’s “ancient landscape and precious heritage,” and accused powerful interest groups of prioritizing tourism and political agendas over religious and cultural values.

Approved last fall by Israel’s Tourism Ministry as a way to ferry visitors to Jerusalem’s Old City over traffic-clogged streets, the project has prompted a flood of complaints from Palestinian residents and urban planners.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →






We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Combined Shape
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation