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Texas mascot charges Georgia bulldog, topples barricade

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NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The Texas football program’s mascot, a large white and brown longhorn steer named Bevo, caused a stir at the Sugar Bowl on Tuesday when it knocked down its barricade and briefly charged in the direction of Georgia’s mascot , a bulldog name Uga.

Uga X, an English bulldog wearing a bright red Georgia sweater, was quickly pulled out of harm’s way, but Bevo’s head and horns appeared to make contact with several people, including a couple of photographers, who scampered out of the way or were knocked down.

There were no reported injuries and Bevo was quickly restrained.

The incident, about an hour before kickoff, was caught on video and quickly became a sensation on social media.

Texas athletics spokesman John Bianco said “all established safety and security measures were in place for Bevo” at the Sugar Bowl, including two halters, two chains and six handlers to hold him.

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More AP college football: https://apnews.com/collegefootball and http://www.twitter.com/AP_Top25

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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