Share
Commentary

If 'Believe Women' Applies to Warren, Shouldn't Libs Always Believe Sarah Sanders & Kellyanne?

Share

Democrats often find themselves tripping over their own words to justify whatever social justice platform they are promoting on any given day.

A case in point is the “believe-all-women” mantra that has been the cornerstone of the #MeToo movement — a mantra which asks people to believe women who accuse men of sexual assault.

The premise is flawed by its very nature in that it asks everyone to assume guilt and then demands that a man prove his innocence, which is the antithesis of the American justice system’s fundamental principle of innocent until proven guilty.

But now, it has extended to politics.

This week, rumors began circulating that Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders told Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren he did not believe a woman could win the presidency.

Trending:
'Not This Time': GOP Lawmaker Speaks for 74 Million Americans, Disarms Libs of Their Favorite Weapon

Sanders, for his part, has denied making the statement the way it has been portrayed, and Warren has continued to insist that it happened the way the story has been told.

It all culminated on Tuesday night in the moments following the end of the Democratic presidential debate, when Warren confronted Sanders.

“I think you called me a liar on national TV,” Warren said.

“What?” Sanders replied.

“I think you called me a liar on national TV,” Warren reiterated.

“You know, let’s not do it right now. If you want to have that discussion, we’ll have that discussion,” Sanders responded.

“You called me a liar,” he said. “You told me — all right, let’s not do it now.”



Rewind a few hours and enter GQ Magazine correspondent Julia Ioffe, who had taken to Twitter on Tuesday afternoon, prior to the debate, to suggest that the “believe women” mantra extends to politics.

Related:
Anchor Shoots Elizabeth Warren Down on Live TV When She Says Dems Will Hold Power for 'a Lot of Time'

“Still thinking about the Warren-Bernie squabble and I have a question to people who have accused Warren of lying,” she tweeted.

“Isn’t the lesson of #metoo and the last few years that we believe women and don’t call them liars?”

This would mean that if Warren — a known liar who has fibbed about her son attending private school, her alleged Native American heritage and many other things — were to win the Democratic presidential nomination, every word she said would have to be believed.

That is a tremendous cover for a politician to have — to not be judged on her merits and scrutinized like everyone else, but to be given a pass because of her gender.

And if every woman does have to be believed, why is this concession not afforded to White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, former White House press secretary Sarah Sanders or any other Republican woman?

They are called liars on a near-daily basis on social media and on national television.

Take, for example, Eric Schultz, a senior adviser to former President Barack Obama.

“Trump White House adviser Kellyanne Conway lies. She lies a lot. Yet CNN and MSNBC have shown zero hesitation in giving her a platform to lie because they see their job as giving government officials — even ones who lie — a platform,” he tweeted Thursday.

Or consider Randy Bryce, a surrogate for Bernie Sanders, commenting on Sarah Sanders.

“We already paid you to lie to us,” he wrote in response to her tweets regarding a book she wrote about the Trump presidency.

It seems that to the left, “believe all women” only applies to fellow liberals.

The double standard is astounding.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , , , , , , , , ,
Share
Carmine Sabia is a political pundit, editor and writer and has been featured on various television and radio programs. He is a former professional wrestling promoter and real estate investor.
Carmine Sabia is a political pundit, editor and writer and has been featured on various television and radio programs. He is a former professional wrestling promoter and real estate investor.




Conversation