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Biden's Best Argument Against Voting Security Bills Flatlines as Black Americans Speak Up

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President Joe Biden has slammed a bevy of election security bills from lawmakers across the country as “Jim Crow 2.0,” a claim that is falling apart as black Americans make their true thoughts known.

Biden originally made his big attack against the collective bills during an address in Georgia on Jan. 11.

Speaking to the 34 laws and 400 bills being passed by Republicans at the state and local levels to defend fair and open elections, Biden painted a dark picture of where the GOP was taking America.

“Jim Crow 2.0 is about two insidious things: voter suppression and election subversion,” Biden warned. “It’s no longer about who gets to vote; it’s about making it harder to vote. It’s about who gets to count the vote and whether your vote counts at all.”

The president explicitly assured Americans that this comparison to repressive brutality from roughly a century ago was not an exaggeration.

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“It’s not hyperbole;” Biden said, “this is a fact.”

“Look, this matters to all of us,” he continued. “The goal of the former president and his allies is to disenfranchise anyone who votes against them. Simple as that.”

Regardless of your thoughts on Joe Biden, you have to admit that the man can tell a story.

But despite this tale of our republic hanging by a thread with former President Donald Trump and his cronies ready to gobble up our country and turn back the clock on civil rights, it looks like Biden’s target audience just isn’t buying it.

Do you support election integrity bills?

The group that would have the most to lose under a second iteration of Jim Crow laws, black Americans, appears to overwhelmingly support Republicans’ efforts to strengthen our elections.

One survey of 1,011 likely 2022 general election voters in Michigan, conducted just days before Biden’s speech, seems to indicate the president is barking up the wrong tree when it comes to tying voter fraud prevention to old race-based discrimination laws.

The Remington Research Group study, which reported a margin of error of +/- 3 percent, shows that 79 percent of black Americans polled support rules requiring voters to show identification.

Some 64 percent of black Americans also indicated they were more likely to support candidates who champion these types of security laws.

A survey of 1,200 registered voters conducted by Scott Rasmussen and RMG Research in October of last year only backs up what the RRG study found with shockingly similar findings.

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The percentage of black Americans found to support photo identification laws for voters was 78 percent, just one percentage point shy of what the Michigan poll found for a similar question.

The RMG survey also found that 83 percent of black Americans favor a cutoff date for mail-in ballots, 84 percent want voter rolls purged of the dead and relocated and 71 percent would like a requirement that all voting machines be made in the United States of America. Go figure.

Besides “you ain’t black,” what do you think Biden has to say to that?

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Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard and is a husband, dad and aspiring farmer.
Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He is a husband, dad, and aspiring farmer. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard. If he's not with his wife and son, then he's either shooting guns or working on his motorcycle.
Location
Arkansas
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Military, firearms, history




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