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Biden's Repeated Use of N-Word Comes Back to Haunt Him When Woke Mob Comes for Joe Rogan - Video

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Beware, woke mobsters coming after Joe Rogan. In the process, you could end up damaging President Joe Biden, as well.

As you may have heard, the latest kerfuffle around Rogan, the popular Spotify podcast host, involves episodes where he repeated the N-word contextually in previous episodes of his podcast — not as a slur, but either in quotes or as a discussion about the word itself.

This isn’t the real reason anyone is hunting Rogan, however. His real crime is that he dared to question the left-imposed consensus on a number of issues, particularly COVID-19. (At The Western Journal, we know all too well what Big Tech censorship feels like. We’re not going to give in, however — and you can help us fight Big Tech by subscribing.)

Rogan has apologized for the clips in which he said the slur, despite the fact they were from old episodes. In an apology posted to Instagram, he called it the “most regretful and shameful thing” he’s ever had to address.

“I know that to most people, there’s no context where a white person is ever allowed to say that, never mind publicly on a podcast, and I agree with that,” Rogan said, adding, “I haven’t said it in years.”

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The reaction to Rogan’s apology should be further reinforcement that, when the woke mob comes for you, there’s no refuge in groveling:

Forgiveness in wokeness, remember, is only earned when one’s opinions and existence are merged with the great unthinking progressive blob.

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However, for the pitchfork-wielders, it’s worth noting this is more of an apology than you’ll likely ever hear from Joe Biden, who did roughly the same thing Rogan did back back when he was a senator.

Here’s a video from a 1985 Senate Judiciary Committee hearing that shows Biden — looking and speaking considerably different from the man now in the Oval Office — making repeated use of the word.

As independent journalist and co-founder of The Intercept Glenn Greenwald noted in a tweet, “If you actually think that finding old clips of someone using the n-word is proof they’re a racist, then you would find this infinitely more alarming and important given that he is kind of more powerful than Joe Rogan. But you don’t think that: it’s just a game to silence him.”

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During the clip, Biden quotes a racist state legislator who was speaking during a redistricting process hearing that was overseen by a nominee for deputy attorney general, according to The Associated Press.

This being Joe Biden, however, there was no hand-wringing when the AP “fact-checked” the clip in July of 2020.

The claim the AP was fact-checking: “A video from a 1985 hearing exposes Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden for using the N-word, stating: ‘We already have a n***** mayor, we don’t need any more n***** big shots!’”

The conclusion: “Social media users are twisting comments made by Biden during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing 35 years ago for the nomination of William Bradford Reynolds as U.S. deputy attorney general,” the AP reported.

“Biden was using the comments at the time to build a case against Reynolds’ nomination, pointing out that he ignored racist comments by lawmakers and allowed them to gerrymander Louisiana’s congressional districts in a way that underrepresented Black residents.”

Which is all very true — except Biden did actually say the word. He didn’t have to in order to make a case against the nomination — but he said it, all right, just like Rogan did, which is part of why Rogan is now “the embattled Joe Rogan.” (A montage posted to Instagram by singer India.Arie, a vocal critic of both Spotify and Rogan, shows kind of the contexts where Rogan used the word.)

Rogan isn’t an elected official, however, much less the president of these United States. Nor, indeed, does he have a history of racial solecisms the way that Joe Biden does.

In 2006, when the then-senator was a “potential 2008 presidential candidate,” according to NBC, Biden told an Indian-American man that “you cannot go to a 7-Eleven or a Dunkin’ Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent.”

In 2007, when Biden was part of the field running for the nomination, he said fellow contender and then-Sen. Barack Obama was “articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy.”

In 2019, while seeking his party’s nomination for the 2020 campaign, Biden told a crowd in Iowa that “poor kids are just as bright and just as talented as white kids.”

Also in 2019, as The Washington Post reported at the time, he championed the “civility” of the era in politics in the 1970s when he could work with arch-segregationist Sen. James Eastland of Mississippi. (“He never called me ‘boy.’ He always called me ‘son,’” Biden said, according to the Post.)

In 2020, he criticized then-President Donald Trump for holding China accountable for COVID-19 because Americans can’t tell the difference “between a South Korean and someone from Beijing.”

And now that he’s president, it hasn’t stopped.

In June of last year, Biden said one of the reasons for lower vaccination rates among Hispanics (“Latinx,” Biden said) was that “they’re worried that they’ll be vaccinated and deported.” He called one of his black advisers “boy” during a media briefing.

And leftists claim the problem is Joe Rogan’s use of language?

President Biden may get a pass from the pitchfork-and-torches mob currently surrounding Spotify right now. However, if this is the standard they wish to set, they shouldn’t be surprised when the president is judged in the exact same fashion by the rest of America.

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C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




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