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Lifestyle & Human Interest

Blind Toddler Can't Stop Crying, Cable Technician at House Scoops Him Up and Comforts Him

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Think about the praise you normally reserve for technicians, salesman and public servants of every stripe. “They did their job, and they did it well,” is normally the best kudos that we can give them.

However, not every service-oriented third party you encounter works that way. Some seem satisfied to squeak by, doing the least the possibly can.

Others take the opposite tack. They go above and beyond — even going so far as to help children when the need arises.

We’ve grown used to police officers doing more than merely their jobs. One Colorado officer sweetly tried to comfort a toddler in a moment of utter tragedy.


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Police officer Nick Struck had responded to an accident in Brighton, Colorado, an accident that had turned fatal, CNN reported. Of the six passengers within, one had died while four others had been grievously injured.

Only a gasoline-soaked toddler had escaped injury, and she was frantically howling. So Struck did the only thing he could think: He began to sing “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.”

“She stopped crying,” Struck said. “She was just rubbing my shoulder with the beat.”

The situation Jessica Nash Donnahoo faced wasn’t quite as dire, yet a kind cable technician helped her out all the same, WHNS reported.

See, Donnahoo’s 3-year-old son, Sailor, has a whole host of issues.

“He was born with two rare brain defects and he is blind,” she wrote on Facebook.

“He is unable to communicate his needs, and today has been rough for him. He has been crying all morning.”

So when a Spectrum cable technician named Robert came in to upgrade the family’s service, he could’ve put his head down and simply ignored the situation. But he didn’t do that.

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“When Robert walked in and started talking, Sailor ran to him and reached up. Robert didn’t seem bothered at all and, instead, held my son off and on for the whole 45 minutes he was in our home,” the mother wrote.

The child calmed down and a wave of relief washed over Donnahoo.

“He understood the need for help, saw an opportunity to help another human being and took it,” she told “Good Morning America.”

“I think the reason that this act of kindness has resonated with so many people is that we can all relate — as parents, grandparents or just anyone who has been overwhelmed. In a world of mass shootings, political scandals, and drugs, we all need to be reassured that humanity and kindness still exist. Rob and my post did just that.”

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A graduate of Wheaton College with a degree in literature, Loren also adores language. He has served as assistant editor for Plugged In magazine and copy editor for Wildlife Photographic magazine.
A graduate of Wheaton College with a degree in literature, Loren also adores language. He has served as assistant editor for Plugged In magazine and copy editor for Wildlife Photographic magazine. Most days find him crafting copy for corporate and small-business clients, but he also occasionally indulges in creative writing. His short fiction has appeared in a number of anthologies and magazines. Loren currently lives in south Florida with his wife and three children.
Education
Wheaton College
Location
Florida
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Entertainment, Faith, Travel




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