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Constitution-Hating NPR Gives Absurd "Lesson" On How To Repeal Second Amendment

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With the gun debate in full swing, the National Public Radio published an article outlining how to repeal the second amendment.

The NPR article began quoting the second amendment:

“A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

The survivors of the Parkland shooting on Feb. 14 have created a new movement and “took their protests to social media and beyond.”

However, as NPR pointed out, repealing an amendment could be difficult.

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“Changing or removing (amendments) requires a two-stage process that has proved historically difficult.”

A proposed amendment to the Constitution has to be passed with two-thirds majorities in both the House and the Senate.

“The two chambers have not achieved such a margin for a newly written amendment to the Constitution in nearly half a century,” NPR reported.

If it gets passed by Congress, then it has to be ratified by three-fourths, or 38, of the states.

Do you think it was okay for NPR to suggest repealing the 2nd amendment?

The challenge to get the second amendment repealed would be in the individual gun owners across the country who “care passionately about their right to do so.”

“Overcoming the NRA and other elements of the gun lobby is only the beginning,” NPR said. “The real obstacle would be tremendous support for guns in Southern, Western and rural Midwestern states, which would easily total up to more than enough states to block a gun control amendment.”

Another option would be to call for a Constitutional Convention, outlined in Article V of the Constitution and “allows for a new convention to bypass Congress and address issues of amendment on its own.”

Two-thirds of the state legislatures would have to call for the new convention.

“So if 34 states saw fit, they could convene their delegations and start writing amendments,” NPR said. “Some believe such a convention would have the power to rewrite the entire 1787 Constitution.”

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No matter what, three-fourths of the states have to ratify any changes made by the Constitutional Convention or passed by Congress.

The information presented by NPR is very educational for any voter, and it makes one wonder if there will be a follow up on how to repeal other amendments.

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Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. A University of Oregon graduate, Erin has conducted research in data journalism and contributed to various publications as a writer and editor.
Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. She grew up in San Diego, California, proceeding to attend the University of Oregon and graduate with honors holding a degree in journalism. During her time in Oregon, Erin was an associate editor for Ethos Magazine and a freelance writer for Eugene Magazine. She has conducted research in data journalism, which has been published in the book “Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future.” Erin is an avid runner with a heart for encouraging young girls and has served as a coach for the organization Girls on the Run. As a writer and editor, Erin strives to promote social dialogue and tell the story of those around her.
Birthplace
Tucson, Arizona
Nationality
American
Honors/Awards
Graduated with Honors
Education
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, University of Oregon
Books Written
Contributor for Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future
Location
Prescott, Arizona
Languages Spoken
English, French
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Health, Entertainment, Faith




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