Commentary

FedEx Joins Other Companies That Slighted Conservatives, Cuts Ties to NRA

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Is it a coincidence that FedEx dropped its business relationship with the NRA like a hot potato just days after the tragic synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh?

The company claims the two developments are unrelated, but it’s not a secret it’s been pondering the issue for a while now.

On Tuesday, FedEx announced it was ending pricing discounts offered to NRA members.

Reuters reported the change in FedEx’s policy attitude toward the national gun rights lobby organization.

“It’s a quiet reversal: Eight months ago, FedEx stood by the gun-rights lobby group as other companies scrapped deals. They were reacting to the NRA’s stance after 17 students and staff members were murdered at a Florida high school by a former student. Companies including Delta Air Lines, United Airlines and car-rental firm Enterprise swiftly ended member discounts. At the time, FedEx said that while assault rifles of the kind used in most American mass shootings shouldn’t be in civilian hands, it did not believe in ‘discriminating’ between organizations it works with,” Reuters wrote.

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According to Reuters, FedEx claims the NRA wasn’t generating enough business to justify the member discount. And the NRA isn’t the only organization targeted by the cuts. Reuters noted that FedEx has been notifying dozens of organizations since the beginning of October that it will be terminating previous discount deals.

According to The Hill, FedEx received extreme pressure to end its partnership with the NRA in February after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. At the time FedEx stood its ground refusing to be swayed by political pressure.

In February, the Los Angeles Times listed 25 companies guided by political motivations that have abandoned the NRA. Among them are Walmart, REI, LL Bean, Kroger, Dick’s Sporting Goods, United Airlines, Delta Airlines, Best Western and Avis and Budget Rent a Car, just in case you wanted to do a little boycotting of your own.

At this point I think it is important to note that Reuters couldn’t resist adding that the NRA might not carry the political sway it once did since there seems to be a major corporate shunning of the organization.

Are big corporations making a big mistake by abandoning the NRA?

However, I’m wondering if these corporate giants that have taken a hard left turn into liberal politics have thought this through completely.

Millions of NRA members and gun advocates have a history of push back when their Second Amendment rights are threatened or even just disrespected.

And the reality is that even big companies should keep that in mind.

That was pointed out in The Washington Post, of all places, in a March piece by columnist Megan McCardle:

“But companies in industries that benefit greatly from economies of scale (such as shipping or airlines) can’t stay in business by catering to a small, fanatically partisan fan base. They need to appeal as broadly as possible. Publicly slighting millions of NRA members, and the many more millions who feel some tribal kinship with them, is unlikely to be good for any such business.”

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The point in her column is that the true agenda behind the political statements made by big corporations against the NRA might be to stigmatize a given organization, but might end up hurting the companies more than it does groups like the NRA.

“NRA finances aren’t going to be devastated because members no longer get a small discount to attend its convention. Nor will NRA members stop supporting gun rights because Delta declares them unworthy of a cut-rate fare. They’re more likely to look for another airline,” McArdle wrote.

FedEx denies there was a political motivation to its decision to end its deal with the NRA, but given the polarization of the country, that might not matter to NRA members.

While corporate execs can make decision in their corner offices, millions of just plain average folks across America will be listening, watching and very possibly deciding to spend their money elsewhere.

When will the liberals learn not to mess with real Americans, the Second Amendment and our guns?

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An enthusiastic grassroots Tea Party activist, Lisa Payne-Naeger has spent the better part of the last decade lobbying for educational and family issues in her state legislature, and as a keyboard warrior hoping to help along the revolution that empowers the people to retake control of their, out-of-control, government.
Lisa Payne-Naeger is passionate about all things related to influencing the configuration of our culture … family, education, politics. She’s a former school board member, turned homeschooling mom. In her quest to raise and educate her now-adult children, she has pretty much navigated every challenge and road block possible. Crusading to make the world a better place for them has led her to scrutinize the politically correct directives that steer society.
Birthplace
St. Louis, MO
Nationality
American
Location
St. Louis, MO
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English
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Politics, Health, Family, Education, Homeschooling, Local Politics, Grassroots Activism




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