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Investigation Into Capitol Police Action on Jan. 6 Finds Major Problem

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An internal investigation by the U.S. Capitol Police has found that six of its officers deserve to be punished for their actions during the Jan. 6 Capitol incursion.

“This week, the USCP provided the Department of Justice the administrative cases as part of the ongoing discovery production in the prosecution of the January 6 rioters,” the Capitol Police said in a statement.

“The USCP’s Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) launched 38 internal investigations. The U.S. Attorney’s Office did not find sufficient evidence that any of the officers committed a crime.”

“OPR was able to identify the officers involved in 26 of the cases,” the statement said. In some cases, not enough information was available to identify the officer who was the subject of a complaint.

“In 20 of the cases, no wrongdoing was found,” the statement continued. “Violations were sustained and disciplinary action was recommended in six cases.”

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Three violations were for “conduct unbecoming,” one for failure to comply with directives, one for improper remarks and one for improper dissemination of information.

The Capitol Police said another case involving “an official who is accused of unsatisfactory performance and conduct unbecoming” remains unresolved.

“The six sustained cases should not diminish the heroic efforts of the United States Capitol Police officers,” the statement continued. “On January 6, the bravery and courage exhibited by the vast majority of our employees was inspiring.”

The Daily Caller reported that 1,200 officers were on hand during the incursion.

Over 500 people have been charged for their actions during the riot, according to USA Today.

The announcement of the violations comes as the Capitol Police prepare for Saturday’s “Justice for J6” rally at the Capitol to protest the treatment of imprisoned Jan. 6 rioters.

“The purpose of these peaceful protests is for patriotic Americans to educate their state legislators on the power they have to give instructions to their state’s federal legislators,” organizer Matt Braynard said in a statement.

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“We have composed a draft resolution a state legislature can pass to inform US Senators and Representative to oppose the tyrannical and inhumane treatment of the January 6 political prisoners who have been targeted by the Department of Justice and the FBI.”

Capitol Police Chief Tom Manger said the upcoming rally is being closely monitored, CNN reported.

“After January 6, we made Department-wide changes to the way we gather and share intelligence internally and externally. … I am confident the work we are doing now will make sure our officers have what they need to keep everyone safe,” Manger said in a statement.

Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe said the rally should be a concern because of its potential for violence.

“I think they should take it very seriously. In fact, they should take it more seriously than they took the same sort of intelligence that they likely saw on Jan. 5,” McCabe said.

Braynard said the event will be a “completely peaceful protest.”

“We have told people that when they come, we don’t want to see any messaging about the election, we don’t want to see any messaging on T-shirts and flags or signs about candidates or anything like that,” he added.

CORRECTION, Sep. 13, 2021: A previous version of this article erroneously referred to Andrew McCabe as the current deputy director of the FBI. McCabe was deputy director of the FBI from 2016 to 2018. We apologize to our readers for any confusion we may have caused.

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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