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Joe Rogan Wins: Crosby, Stills & Nash Cry Uncle in Fight with Fearless Podcaster

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The music of Crosby, Stills & Nash has returned to Spotify five months after band members staged a protest that failed to silence podcaster Joe Rogan.

Graham Nash, Stephen Stills and David Crosby had followed former bandmate Neil Young in February when Young objected to Rogan offering a wide range of opinions on the subject of the COVID-19 vaccine.

But as of Saturday, their music was back on Spotify, according to the New York Post.

The website Billboard quoted a source as saying that proceeds from their music on Spotify would go to various COVID-19 charities for at least a month.

Band member David Crosby sought to distance himself from the move.

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“I don’t own it now and the people who do are in business to make money,” he tweeted.

Variety noted that in March 2021, the Iconic Artist Group bought Crosby’s catalog of music. Still, the comment brought a round of mockery on Twitter.

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In February, Young gave Spotify an ultimatum.

“They can have Rogan or Young. Not both,” Young wrote to Warner Records, the Post reported.

The three bandmates whose music has returned then followed suit.

Were the protests against Joe Rogan calling for censorship?

“We support Neil and we agree with him that there is dangerous disinformation being aired on Spotify’s Joe Rogan podcast.”

“While we always value alternate points of view, knowingly spreading disinformation during this global pandemic has deadly consequences,” the band’s statement read.

“Until real action is taken to show that a concern for humanity must be balanced with commerce, we don’t want our music — or the music we made together — to be on the same platform.”

Rogan responded to the furor caused by Young and others who joined in the protest by offering to share more balanced views.

“I’m not trying to promote misinformation. I’m not trying to be controversial,” he said then.

“I’ve never tried to do anything with this podcast other than just talk to people and have interesting conversations.”

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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