Parler Share
News

Laura Loomer Storms the Stage at Women's March, Asks 'What About the Jews?'

Parler Share

Activist Laura Loomer made sure Saturday that attendees at this year’s Women’s March in New York City knew what was missing from the event.

Loomer, who livestreamed herself on Instagram, made her way to the main stage and interrupted Agunda Okeyo, director of the Women’s March New York City. She managed to get that far by telling security she was a media representative.

One she reached the stage, she yelled into the mic, “What about the Jews?”


https://youtu.be/j6T-ffSAgsA

“The Women’s March does not represent Jewish people. The Women’s March is the real Nazi march. The Women’s March hates Jews,” Loomer said.

Trending:
Report: Trump Aide Left Biden a Personal Surprise in White House AC System

She was then taken off the stage by security guards.

“The Women’s March hates Jews! Linda Sarsour is a Jew-hater! Tamika Mallory is a Jew hater!” she called out as she was taken away.

Was Laura Loomer right to denounce the Women's March?

After she was removed, Okeyo said, “This is not a negative day,” according to Vox.

“What we’re doing today is we’re going to uplift each other and we’re going to make sure we stay positive. I want to hear my Jewish family,” she told the crowd.

Loomer remained at the march for about 30 minutes while she commented on the event, the Washington Examiner reported.

Related:
White House Fails in Bid to Stop 'Total Disaster' as OPEC Announces Huge Production Cut

The New York City march included remarks by Democratic Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who said the only anti-Semitism to worry about was the anti-Semitism coming from the White House, according to CNN.

“I think that concerns of anti-Semitism with the current administration in the White House are absolutely valid and we need to make sure that we are protecting the Jewish community and all those that feel vulnerable in this moment,” she said.

However, Florida Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, a former chair of the Democratic National Committee, was among the many Democrats who pulled back from embracing the march due to concerns over anti-Semitism.

“I cannot associate with the national march’s leaders and principles, which refuse to completely repudiate anti-Semitism and all forms of bigotry,” Wasserman Schultz said, according to The Hill. “I cannot walk shoulder to shoulder with leaders who lock arms with outspoken peddlers of hate.”

National Women’s March leaders Bob Bland, Carmen Perez, Mallory and Sarsour have been under fire for their ties to Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan.

By way of a response, New York City’s march included several speakers who said there is unity between Jewish women and minorities.

However, as an indication in the loss of unity since the first Women’s March in 2017, New York City was host to two competing marches.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Parler Share
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




Conversation