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Lincoln Statue Reportedly Defaced Because He Allowed Execution of Convicted Murderers and Rapists

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In yet another example of the left’s harebrained crusade to erase American history, a statue of Abraham Lincoln in San Francisco was defaced amid innuendo that the president most famous for emancipating slaves was racist.

The vandalism occurred on Dec. 26 at San Francisco’s City Hall. That’s the 158th anniversary of a fateful day in 1862 when 38 Sioux warriors were hanged following a bloody clash with white settlers in Minnesota in an event known as the Sioux Uprising, according to Britannica.

Freelance journalist Christopher Beale posted photos of the defaced statue, which showed Lincoln‘s face spray-painted a blood-red hue.

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In an accompanying Medium blog post, Beale recounted what he saw. Basically, he felt the vandalism was justified.

“I was walking by City Hall Sunday morning when I saw it — the statue of the 16th president, Abraham Lincoln had its face painted red,” Beale wrote. “The letters of his last name were also painted red. As of yet, we don’t know who vandalized the statue, but history may give us a clue as to why.”

Beale opined that the vandalism of the Lincoln statue was apparent payback for the executions of 38 Sioux men, who were accused of stealing food from a white farmer and then murdering five members of his family during a dispute over the alleged theft, according to History.

The incident escalated into a brutal battle after the Dakota Indian tribe (commonly known as the Sioux) reportedly declared war on the settlement. When the battle was over, 150 Sioux Indians died, while more than 500 white settlers were killed.

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Over 300 Sioux warriors were tried, convicted and sentenced to death in 1862 by a military tribunal.

However, thanks to Abraham Lincoln’s intervention, only 38 who were convicted were hanged.

“President Lincoln personally reviewed each case, ultimately providing a reprieve to all but 38 of the condemned, who Lincoln believed were guilty of murder or rape,” Beale wrote.

It was the largest mass execution in U.S. history.

The latest act of vandalism in San Francisco follows a string of similar instances of property destruction perpetrated by antifa and Black Lives Matter activists claiming to be protesting “systemic racism” in a nation that twice elected a black president.

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It really doesn’t matter why vandals deface or torch taxpayer-funded property or statues of historical figures like Christopher Columbus or George Washington. You can always find a way to rationalize any crime.

What is alarming is the left’s ongoing attempts to rewrite or erase history by destroying statues or censoring news they don’t like. Ultimately, this reckless cancel culture will backfire on them.

In November, a California school district banned five classic American novels from their classrooms, claiming they espoused “racism.”

The censored books were “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee, “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain, “Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck, “The Cay” by Theodore Taylor and “Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry” by Mildred D. Taylor

In a comical irony, one of the banned books was written by Mildred Taylor, who’s the great-granddaughter of a former slave.

Let this sink in: The left’s deranged attempts to stamp out “racism” resulted in them canceling a black female author with personal ties to slavery. Talk about cutting off your nose to spite your face.

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Samantha Chang is a politics writer, lawyer and financial editor based in New York City.
Samantha Chang is a politics writer and financial editor based in New York City.




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