Share
News

Meat Loaf Was 'Scared to Death' of COVID, But He Always Kept One Thing in Mind

Share

Iconic singer Meat Loaf, who died Thursday, reportedly of COVID-19, had taken a strong stand for individual freedom during coronavirus lockdowns.

The 74-year-old singer, whose real name was Marvin Lee Aday, had contracted COVID and fallen seriously ill this week, according to the Mirror and TMZ.

The announcement on Meat Loaf’s official Facebook page made no mention of the cause of his death.

Meat Loaf spoke about COVID-19 during a 2021 interview with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette before an appearance at Steel City Con, a Pittsburgh comic book convention.

He told the reporter he would be “happy to give you a hug. I hug people in the middle of COVID.”

Trending:
ESPN's Sage Steele Bloodied and Hospitalized After Being Pelted by Errant Shot at PGA Championship: Report

“You do? You’re not afraid?” the reporter asked.

“Oh, I’m scared to death! You kidding me? But I’m sorry, I understood stopping life for a little while, but they cannot continue to stop life because of politics. And right now they’re stopping because of politics,” Meat Loaf said.

“And on CNN last night, it finally came out that the masks we’re all wearing are useless. But I’ve known that for six months. They don’t do anything. They don’t stop you from getting COVID. They’re just a nuisance and make your nose itch and make it so you can’t breathe.”

He then spoke about how power made some people crazy.

Has the virus made some people power-mad?

“The only good masks are N95. But we got one, and it was so badly made, the straps were so short, they would go on a child. So we had to go on the airplane with the paper masks, and then on the way back, we got a Nazi: ‘Get your mask on now!’ They’re power-mad now,” he told the Post-Gazette.

After the reporter said, “We’re being controlled by everybody,” Meat Loaf had a reply ready.

“Yeah, I know. But not me. If I die, I die, but I’m not going to be controlled,” he said.

Related:
Struggling 'Saturday Night Live' Set to Undergo Major Talent Shakeup - Big Stars Depart Show

Meat Loaf said he made comic book convention appearances “so I can continue to communicate with fans and the people that support me. It’s important to communicate with them.”

“At comic con, it’s like double action. They talk, I talk. They talk, I talk. Mostly I talk after they talk,” he said.

Meat Loaf acknowledged that “going out and interacting scares me” but said comic con appearances were different.

I’m behind a table. I know they’re coming, and they talk to me — and that’s great. And there’s basically a window,” he told the Post-Gazette.

“I have called out people at comic cons, other entertainers, for not even looking at the people. Everybody is due the same respect that you want for yourself.

“No one is more important than anybody else.”

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , ,
Share
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




Conversation