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Michigan Police Honor Kids Who Turned in Wallet Stuffed Full of Cash

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Honesty lives in Michigan. Just ask Jason Burchardt.

Burchardt unknowingly lost his wallet at a park in Hopkins, just south of Grand Rapids, but two honest teens returned his money — and restored his faith in humanity.

The police department in nearby Wayland revealed that Logan Mishoe, 14, and Austin Nichols, 13, had turned aside the chance at easy money to do the right thing.

“I was talking to one of the Allegan deputies out back of our police department when Austin (L) and Logan (R) walked up. Seems they found a wallet belonging to a gentleman from Hopkins. Several $100 bills, $364 total was tucked safely inside,” Wayland Police Chief Mark Garnsey posted on the department’s Facebook page Aug. 4.

“Logan and Austin are Wayland Police Citizens of the Day! The deputy is delivering the wallet as we speak. Way to go gents!” he posted.

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After having his wallet returned, Burchardt, who lives in Hopkins, rewarded the boys with $50 each for their honesty.

Burchardt had gone home after a lunch at the park and did not know his wallet was missing until an Allegan County sheriff’s deputy came to his house to return it.

“We sat in the pavilion at the table and we ate lunch, and then got up and left,” he said. “I had no idea my wallet was even missing. No clue.”

The boys found the wallet on a park bench.

“I sat down and I almost sat on it and Austin was like, ‘Oh, Logan, look.’ And I was like, ‘what?’ And I looked down and there’s a wallet,” Logan said, according to WXMI-TV.

Burchardt was floored.

“It’s not the norm,” he said. “Many people today would just take the money and run with it.”

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Garnsey was pleased that the boys acted to practice what they have been taught.

“These are all our kids and when they do the right thing like that, I’m about as happy as the parent,” he said. “It’s a tough spot right now for all of us and to be able to share this with the community –I’m proud that our citizens acted this way.”

Burchardt said the teens exhibited a rare characteristic.

“It’s super easy to do the right thing when someone is standing there and sees you do it,” he said. “It’s a whole other level of integrity when no one knows what you’ve found and what you have, and you still do the right thing.”

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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