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Nashville Bomber's Neighbor Reveals Chilling Thing He Said Leading Up to Explosion

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A neighbor of the man authorities say blew himself up on Christmas morning in Nashville said that four days before the incident, Anthony Quinn Warner made a chilling comment about the days to come.

Rick Laude saw Warner by his mailbox on Dec. 21, according to Fox News.

After a bit of small talk, Laude asked, “Is Santa going to bring you anything good for Christmas?”

As Laude recalled on Monday, Warner smiled.

“Oh, yeah, Nashville and the world is never going to forget me,” Warner then said.

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“Laude, 57, a commercial truck driver, said he didn’t think much of the remark and thought Warner only meant that ‘something good’ was going to happen for him. He said he was ‘speechless’ later when he read that authorities had identified Warner as the suspected bomber,” Fox reported.

“Nothing about this guy raised any red flags,” Laude said. “He was just quiet.”

Officials noted Monday that a motive remains elusive.

“We hope to get an answer. Sometimes, it’s just not possible,” said David Rausch, director of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. “The best way to find a motive is to talk to the individual. We will not be able to do that in this case.

“It does appear that the intent was more destruction than death but again that’s all still speculation at this point as we continue in our investigation with all our partners.”

According to WSMV-TV, a source “close to the federal investigation” said that among the angles being investigated was whether Warner believe 5G technology was being used as a way to spy on Americans.

The U.K. Daily Mail offered a slightly different theory.

“The unofficial motive thus far is the suspect believed 5G was the root of all deaths in the region and he’d be hailed a hero,” a source told the Daily Mail.

The outlet reported another AT&T connection.

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Warner’s father, Charles Warner, worked for AT&T subsidiary BellSouth and died in 2011 at the age of 78, according to the Daily Mail.

Steve Schmoldt, who lived next Warner for 25 years, called Warner “low-key,” adding, “some people would say he’s a little odd,” according to the Tennessean.

“You never saw anyone come and go,” Schmoldt said. “Never saw him go anywhere. As far as we knew, he was kind of a computer geek that worked at home.”

Warner had no obvious political leanings, Schmoldt said.

“I can tell you as far as politics, he never had any yard signs or flags in his window or anything like that. If he did have any political beliefs he kept, that was something he kept to himself.”

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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