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Nullification: Calif. Town Takes Massive Stand Against State's Sanctuary Law

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Tensions between the state of California and the federal government over “sanctuary laws” are already strained — but now even cities are joining the fray, and starting to reject liberal immigration policies at the local level.

A law recently signed by Democrat Governor Jerry Brown gives cover to illegal immigrants who are arrested in California, by prohibiting police from telling Immigration and Customs Enforcement when a criminal who is facing deportation is released from detention.

In other words, Democrats in California want to purposely block law enforcement from communicating and enforcing the law… and the city of Los Alamitos just sent a strong message back to the governor.

“(The) California city voted on Monday to exempt itself from the state’s sanctuary law, which limits cooperation between local authorities and federal immigration enforcement,” reported Fox News.

“Following more than two hours of heated testimony from residents on both sides of the debate, the Los Alamitos City Council voted 4-1 to opt out of the California Values Act,” continued the report.

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The local ordinance passed by Los Alamitos declares that the liberal sanctuary policy “may be in direct conflict with federal laws and the Constitution.”

Incredibly, it looks like at least one group still takes the Constitution seriously, and is standing up for the oath that elected officials and law enforcement officers take to the founding principles of America.

The council announced that it “finds that it is impossible to honor our oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States” without opting out of the liberal sanctuary law.

Unsurprisingly, there was a bit of controversy surrounding the city’s decision. A crowd of people arrived at the council meeting to voice — and sometimes shout — either their support or disdain for sanctuary policies.

Do you agree with this city's decision to reject sanctuary policies?

“They are asserting their right to ensure (the Constitution) remains the main law of the land,” local resident Arthur Schaper told KTTV News.

Another resident who is himself an immigrant from Israel explained to The Los Angeles Times that people need to respect a nation’s borders and rules, which is why he supports the city’s decision.

“The law is the law and has to be enforced all over the country,” Moti Cohen told the newspaper. “The country is a law-and-order country and you have to come here legally.”

However, some residents rejected the move as being un-American. “What we don’t understand what we fear we kill. And that’s what we’re doing we’re killing the spirit of this nation which is American,” a woman named Joanne Abuqartoumy declared to the Times.

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It isn’t clear how following the Constitution, respecting the law, and allowing police agencies to actually share information is “killing the spirit” of America.

On the contrary, the liberal attempt to protect law-breakers while putting United States citizens at risk is not only killing the spirit of the nation, it’s literally taking the lives of Americans who are impacted by immigrant crimes.

Nullification — the process of state and local governments rejecting terrible laws — can be a powerful tool for conservatives. The city of Los Alamitos is leading the way… and hopefully, even more citizens will begin to stand up against broken sanctuary city laws.

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Benjamin Arie is an independent journalist and writer. He has personally covered everything ranging from local crime to the U.S. president as a reporter in Michigan before focusing on national politics. Ben frequently travels to Latin America and has spent years living in Mexico.




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