Trump Predicts 'Red Wave' After Seeing His Own Approval Rating

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President Donald Trump shared an upbeat view of November’s midterm elections on Sunday, predicting a “red wave” in November.

Although traditionally the party that holds the White House loses some congressional seats in the election held midway through a president’s term, Trump has said tradition means less than the state of the country. On Sunday, he also cited his strong approval numbers.

“Presidential Approval numbers are very good – strong economy, military and just about everything else. Better numbers than Obama at this point, by far. We are winning on just about every front and for that reason there will not be a Blue Wave, but there might be a Red Wave!” he tweeted.

On Friday, a Rasmussen Reports poll showed Trump with a 48 percent approval rating, as opposed to 50 percent who did not approve of the job the president is doing. Since April, Rasmussen’s daily tracking poll has shown Trump with an approval rating that has fluctuated  between 44 percent and 51 percent, usually around the level shown on Friday.

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During an Ohio rally on Saturday, Trump downplayed predictions that Republicans would lose seats in the midterm elections,The Washington Post reported. .

“Why? We have the greatest economy in the history of our country … I think it could be a red wave,” Trump said.

During the rally, Trump said his supporters in the audience were the nation’s true elite, and they were “forgotten no more.”

Do you think the GOP will gain seats in Congress this fall?

“The elite. They’re more elite than me? I am better everything than they have, including this,” Trump said, pointing to his head, according to the Chicago Tribune. “And I became president and they didn’t. Meaning you became president. And it’s driving them crazy.”

Trump has said that electing Republicans will end the logjam on major legislation that has stalled in Congress.

Trump’s positive impact with Republican voters and candidates was documented by the Wesleyan Media Project, which noted that Trump was popular among GOP candidates in their ads.

“President Trump was referenced positively in 14.8 percent of federal election ads (amounting to over 27,000 ads) in the past two months, whereas President Obama was mentioned positively in less than 1 percent of federal election ads aired during the same time period in 2010 and 2014,” the study reported.

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Even those opposed to Trump know he can tip the balance.

“There are going to be many races across the country where Trump will be the most important factor in the race, despite neither candidate mentioning him in an ad. He wouldn’t have it any other way,” said Josh Schwerin, communications director of the progressive group Priorities USA, according to Axios.

Trump is not only talking about the red wave, he is working to make it happen, with a hectic campaign schedule on behalf of GOP candidates, The Associated Press reported Sunday. Trump is also financially supporting about 100 GOP candidates, the AP reported.

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
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Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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