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Tucker Carlson Gets Last Laugh Over Leftist Journalist After First Twitter Episode Drops

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To the tens of millions of Americans who are fed up with the establishment media’s torrent of lies on behalf of the powerful Tucker Carlson’s move to Twitter, represents the liberation of a truth-telling voice.

To an establishment-media leftist, Carlson’s new show, “Tucker on Twitter,” poses serious danger.

On Tuesday, The Washington Post’s Taylor Lorenz, who calls herself a “Technology Journalist,” responded to the first episode of Carlson’s show with the sort of condescending dismissiveness that desperate people often employ as a cloak for their desperation. “Not sure how he’s going to stack up against even an average streamer or youtuber,” Lorenz tweeted.

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Thirteen minutes later, Lorenz downplayed Carlson’s eight-figure view count and even hinted that the new show will not likely keep viewers watching all the way to the end of each episode.

No doubt Lorenz will continue acting as a shill for the establishment, but her casual dismissals have already not aged well.

Less than sixteen hours after it appeared on Twitter, Carlson’s first episode had exceeded 65 million views. With understated glee, Libs of Tik Tok on Twitter declared that “Tucker Broke Taylor Lorenz.”

Predictably, Carlson’s spectacular success forced Lorenz to change her tune from barely concealed desperation to barely concealed contempt for everyone on Twitter, including Elon Musk.

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No doubt Lorenz and her establishment leftist followers were still seething over Musk’s recent endorsement of Matt Walsh’s wildly successful documentary, “What is a Woman?”

Meanwhile, Carlson’s first episode has now soared past 100 million views.

Lorenz’s tweets illustrate her rhetorical strategy, which in turn reflects a pattern of thought characteristic of modern establishment leftists.

She begins by using her role as “Technology Journalist” to position herself as an expert on the production-related qualities of Carlson’s show. This allows her to reassure her like-minded Twitter followers that Carlson’s gullible viewers, as Lorenz and her elitist friends have always known, are mere sheep, hypnotized by a cable-news program’s bells and whistles. Lacking these, Carlson is surely doomed to fail.

Alas, approximately 20 hours and tens of millions of views later, Carlson did not fail.

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Now Lorenz must shift gears and reassure her followers that Carlson cannot have succeeded because he brings a message truth-starved viewers crave. She insists that Carlson’s show has attracted viewers only because “Elon Musk and his cronies” have promoted it.

Whether by casually dismissing the show’s production qualities or by conjuring the tiresome bugbear of a Musk-led conspiracy — Carlson’s own words refute that canard — Lorenz serves her purpose as an establishment-media journalist, which is to soothe establishment leftist anxieties by pushing establishment leftist narratives.

Lorenz’s words, however, do not conceal the establishment’s desperation as well as she intended.

If establishment forces cannot again silence him, Carlson will continue to expose their lies.

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Michael Schwarz holds a Ph.D. in History and has taught at multiple colleges and universities. He has published one book and numerous essays on Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and the Early U.S. Republic. He loves dogs, baseball, and freedom. After meandering spiritually through most of early adulthood, he has rediscovered his faith in midlife and is eager to continue learning about it from the great Christian thinkers.
Michael Schwarz holds a Ph.D. in History and has taught at multiple colleges and universities. He has published one book and numerous essays on Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and the Early U.S. Republic. He loves dogs, baseball, and freedom. After meandering spiritually through most of early adulthood, he has rediscovered his faith in midlife and is eager to continue learning about it from the great Christian thinkers.




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