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UN Climate Agency To Get Millions from US

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President Donald Trump is planning on giving millions to the U.N. mechanism designed to tackled man-made global warming, despite the president’s past budgets that didn’t fund the program.

Trump’s 2019 budget proposal provided a total of $6.4 million to pay U.S. dues to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change and its arm, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

That dollar amount was never mentioned in the budget document White House’s Office of Management and Budget, according to a February report from E&E News.

The allocation would “enable the U.S. to effectively advance its interests in these bodies, and to reflect an approach that balances energy security, economic development, and environmental protection,” a State Department official told E&E News.

The UNFCC’s core budget for 2018 and 2019 is nearly $60 million, according to the fund’s proposed budget proposal.

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Trump’s fiscal 2018 budget plan nixed funding for all U.N. climate programs.

The administration crafted the budget under the pledge not to advance U.N. climate objectives.

It eliminated dues for the UNFCCC and IPCC, along with the Green Climate Fund, which provided aid for poor countries attempting to finance various climate change programs.

The U.N. launched GCF in 2010 to promote green energy initiatives around the world.
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The organization has committed nearly $4 billion into international projects that aim to reduce carbon emissions and help developing countries overcome the impacts of climate change.
Conservatives have criticized the fund for being costly and ineffective.

Former President Barack Obama pledged $3 billion to the GCF — he plowed $1 billion into the moribund fund before the Trump administration took over. Trump — as part of his decision to withdraw from the Paris accord — halted U.S. contributions in 2017 and refused to give the remaining $2 billion. The move cut the GCF’s entire budget by 20 percent.

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The U.S. is also the World Bank’s largest supporter and shareholder, owning 17 percent of organization’s shares. The next largest owner, Japan, owns just under 8 percent.

Several bills moving through Congress would grant the World Bank, along with other Multilateral Development Banks, roughly $1.8 billion.

The World Bank works with poor and developing countries to improve their infrastructure.

The bank seeks to “galvanize international and national efforts to end extreme poverty globally within a generation and to promote ‘shared prosperity,’ a sustainable increase in the well-being of the poorer segments of society.”

The bank’s overarching goal is to bring the percentage of world’s population living in extreme poverty — on less than $1.90 a day — to 3 percent.

A version of this article appeared on The Daily Caller News Foundation website. Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

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Founded by Tucker Carlson, a 25-year veteran of print and broadcast media, and Neil Patel, former chief policy adviser to Vice President Dick Cheney, The Daily Caller News Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit providing original investigative reporting from a team of professional reporters that operates for the public benefit. Photo credit: @DailyCaller on Twitter




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