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US Sees Lowest Number of New Coronavirus Cases in Ages

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The lowest number of new coronavirus cases in the United States since March 25 was observed on Monday, showing a downward trend across the country.

About 17,250 cases of coronavirus were reported on Monday, the lowest number of new cases since about 11,919 cases were reported at the end of March, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

This is seemingly good news for the country with the highest number of confirmed cases and deaths from coronavirus.

As of Tuesday morning, there have been 1.9 million cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. and 111,014 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins.

Although the number of new cases across the country as a whole is trending downward, there are still many states that have reported an uptick in new cases, The Wall Street Journal reported.

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In North Carolina, more people were hospitalized with COVID-19 on Monday than any other day during the pandemic.

An outbreak in Vermont also led to at least 62 new infections.

Meanwhile, the number of COVID-19 cases in Arkansas increased by 450 on Saturday, Forbes reported.

Confirmed cases also rose in California, Utah, Arizona, Florida and Texas over the weekend, according to the Johns Hopkins five-day moving average.

Do you think we will continue to see this downward trend?

“It’s a very mixed picture,” infectious-disease specialist Wafaa El-Sadr told Fox News.

“In some places, we have made amazing progress, and there are other places where I remain very concerned about what’s going on,” she said.

The downward trend in daily new cases comes in part because of progress in states that were hit the hardest by the novel coronavirus, including New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.

“If you take out the impact of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and so on, you’d have a much more worrisome picture of what’s happening in the U.S.,” El-Sadr said.

Upticks in new confirmed coronavirus cases also could be explained by an increase in testing.

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In order for states to reopen, the World Health Organization recommended a positive test rate of 5 percent or below.

There have been some questions about coronavirus metrics as some states are reporting “probable cases” and others are not.

In particular, both Pennsylvania and Colorado have had to remove hundreds of deaths from the official coronavirus death tolls.

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Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. A University of Oregon graduate, Erin has conducted research in data journalism and contributed to various publications as a writer and editor.
Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. She grew up in San Diego, California, proceeding to attend the University of Oregon and graduate with honors holding a degree in journalism. During her time in Oregon, Erin was an associate editor for Ethos Magazine and a freelance writer for Eugene Magazine. She has conducted research in data journalism, which has been published in the book “Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future.” Erin is an avid runner with a heart for encouraging young girls and has served as a coach for the organization Girls on the Run. As a writer and editor, Erin strives to promote social dialogue and tell the story of those around her.
Birthplace
Tucson, Arizona
Nationality
American
Honors/Awards
Graduated with Honors
Education
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, University of Oregon
Books Written
Contributor for Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future
Location
Prescott, Arizona
Languages Spoken
English, French
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Health, Entertainment, Faith




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