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Do You Use Any of These Words Online? The FBI May Have Flagged You for 'Violent Extremism'

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Careful, Chad and Stacy, if you plan to do an online post reviewing that old film “The Matrix,” with its discussions of the red pill and such.

Because if you decide to just be the first in your group to do that review, especially if your group includes incels, it’s over. And don’t be looksmaxxing, either.

Huh? What’s with the above two weird sentences?

This: they contain words and phrases the FBI is monitoring because they’re part of a “glossary of terms” the FBI is using to determine words connecting to violence, according to documents accessed by the Oversight Project of the Heritage Foundation.

Not content to make up stuff about a sitting president, Donald Trump, view public school parents with suspicion, or warn of violent tendencies of Catholics who attend the Latin Mass, the federal police are trolling the internet for terms they believe are suspicious.

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Terms like “red pill” (verb “redpill”) is a reference to a Matrix character being offered a red pill that gives him an irreversible life change to see reality instead of the machine-created illusion of the apparent world.

As a result, individuals learning to dissent from the establishment narratives regarding vaccines, elections, so-called conspiracy theories and more, describe themselves as having been “redpilled.”

Ah, but the FBI says “in the context of RMVE [Racially or Ethically Motivated Extremism] ideology, taking the red pill or becoming ‘redpilled’ indicates the adoption of racist, anti-Semitic or fascist beliefs,” according to its Glossary of Terms Used by RMVE’s.

Do you think you are on some kind of FBI list?

Looks like the FBI will be busy — I googled “red pill” and got 692 million results. And I don’t think they were all related to pharmacists.

Other terms that get their attention are “just be first” and “it’s over.”

Then there’s “Chad.” That’s the generic online name given to a guy who seems to have a knack for attracting all the girls. That’s frustrating to the men known as “incels,” or “involuntary celibates,” who repeatedly fail to get the attention of women.

“While most incels do not estngage in violence, IVEs have conducted at least five lethal attacks in the United States and Canada,” the FBI document states.

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The FBI is watching for mentions of “Chad,” since the Bureau is compiling a list entitled “Involuntary Celibate Violent Extremism.” “Chad” has a female counterpart — “Stacy” — and the FBI is looking for her name, too, The Daily Signal said.

Want to be like “Chad” and “Stacy”? Just engage in “looksmaxxing,” or work on making yourself more attractive.

But there’s a problem with that. Post that you’re “looksmaxxing” and you’ll also attract the FBI; they’re suspicious of that term, too.

And unless they’re reformed, there’s no doubt the federals will be drilling down even more on internet communication.

Remind me –in the Bill of Rights, which amendment is listed first?

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Mike Landry, PhD, is a retired business professor. He has been a journalist, broadcaster and church pastor. He writes from Northwest Arkansas on current events and business history.
Mike Landry, PhD, is a retired business professor. He has been a journalist, broadcaster and church pastor. He writes from Northwest Arkansas on current events and business history.




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