News

Watch Police Haul Man Out of Library for Not Wearing Mask During Meeting Over Wearing Masks

A man was physically removed from a school board meeting in Mitchell, South Dakota, on Monday night because he refused to wear a protective face covering.

Reed Bender had attended meetings in the past and spoken against mask mandates, according to the Mitchell Republic.

At Monday’s meeting to discuss public opposition to the district’s mask mandate, Bender refused to put on a mask even when one was offered to him.

Although many residents oppose the mandate, some school board members have said a “survey wouldn’t change” their minds, the Republic reported.

“The medical professionals have recommended [masks], and my wife cares for and has treated several patients who have had COVID-19,” board member Kevin Kenkel said.

Trending:
Entitled Woman Assaults McDonald's Employees for Refusing Her Special Request, They Fight Back and She Ends Up Leaving in Handcuffs

“She has seen the long-term effects on people,” he said. “Even if 75 percent said we don’t want masks, I would still vote in favor of masks.”

Superintendent Joe Graves called the police to help with Bender.

“The board said there is a masking mandate and everyone in the school building must wear a mask,” Graves told the Republic.

“We gave the gentleman fair warning of that and offered him a mask. He refused, so the board had to enforce the mandate.”

Do you think mask mandates are unnecessary?

Police officers arrived 20 minutes later and tried to get Bender to wear a mask, but he refused.

“You’re going to have to drag me out,” he said.

The officer then physically removed him from the library where the meeting was held.

WARNING: The following video contains vulgar language that some viewers may find offensive.



Related:
Gov. Kristi Noem Just Sued the Biden Administration

Bender resisted the officers as other people urged him to stop, video of the altercation showed.

One officer pulled out his taser but was hesitant to use it.

“You’re going to have to tase me in front of all these people,” Bender said.

“I want these people to video it while their cops of minority descent have to do this to everybody,” he said.

One woman off-screen said that Bender just “wants to have a say.”

After a little more struggle, the officers were able to remove Bender from the room.

“Never in my entire career as a superintendent have I had that happen before,” Graves told the Republic.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



loading

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , , ,
Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. A University of Oregon graduate, Erin has conducted research in data journalism and contributed to various publications as a writer and editor.
Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. She grew up in San Diego, California, proceeding to attend the University of Oregon and graduate with honors holding a degree in journalism. During her time in Oregon, Erin was an associate editor for Ethos Magazine and a freelance writer for Eugene Magazine. She has conducted research in data journalism, which has been published in the book “Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future.” Erin is an avid runner with a heart for encouraging young girls and has served as a coach for the organization Girls on the Run. As a writer and editor, Erin strives to promote social dialogue and tell the story of those around her.
Birthplace
Tucson, Arizona
Nationality
American
Honors/Awards
Graduated with Honors
Education
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, University of Oregon
Books Written
Contributor for Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future
Location
Prescott, Arizona
Languages Spoken
English, French
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Health, Entertainment, Faith




loading

Conversation