Share

$85K-a-Year Yale Law Cancels 31 Classes So Students Can Protest Kavanaugh

Share

When Yale Law School students took to the campus Monday to protest against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, many did not need to worry about what might be happening in class.

The school canceled 31 of its classes that day to give students a wide open schedule to oppose President Donald Trump’s second nomination to the Supreme Court.

Students at Yale Law, which posts an annual cost of slightly more than $85,000, staged a sit-in wearing black to demonstrate against Kavanaugh’s confirmation.

https://twitter.com/danabolger/status/1043181207566118912

Trending:
Plumber Makes 'Unbelievable' Discovery in the Walls of Joel Osteen's Megachurch That Might Solve a Years-Old Crime

“The allegations of sexual misconduct against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh are rightly causing deep concern at Yale Law School and across the country,” Yale Law School Dean Heather Gerken said in a statement, the New Haven Register reported.

“As dean, I cannot take a position on the nomination, but I am so proud of the work our community is doing to engage with these issues, and I stand with them in supporting the importance of fair process, the rule of law and the integrity of the legal system,” she said.

Yale Law School spokeswoman Debra Kroszer told Campus Reform Monday that “Yale Law School did not cancel all classes,” but, “many faculty members chose to reschedule or cancel their own classes today. And some held classes as usual.”

Should these classes have been canceled?

Some wondered if the time could have been put to a better use.

“While I respect the right of the students protesting to make their voices heard, I disagree with professors’ decisions to cancel classes at the request of those protesters,” said Emily Hall, a student at Yale Law.

“It effectively encourages students to participate in the protests and penalizes those who choose not to by disrupting the class schedule,” Hall said.

Yale professor Nicholas Christakis suggested that protesting in obedience to authority was not truly protesting.

“For civil disobedience to be praiseworthy and serious, protestors must be willing to bear the costs of the then-extant sanctions. Cancelling class so that students can protest, and doing so only for one end of political spectrum, seems hard to defend,” he tweeted.

Related:
Troops Deployed to South Pacific as Deadly Chaos Erupts on Island Chain

Kavanaugh graduated from Yale Law School in 1990. One of the accusations of sexual assault against him stems form his time at Yale.

The Supreme Court nominee has denied all the claims against him.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , ,
Share
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




Conversation

The Western Journal is pleased to bring back comments to our articles! Due to threatened de-monetization by Big Tech, we had temporarily removed comments, but we have now implemented a solution to bring back the conversation that Big Tech doesn't want you to have. If you have any problems using the new commenting platform, please contact customer support at commenting-help@insticator.com. Welcome back!