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Ex-New Jersey gov to states: Fight US control of sports bets

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NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is telling states to oppose a bill that would give the federal government control over regulating sports betting.

The Republican said Friday at a conference of legislators that state have proven they can handle the job. Christie began a court battle against the major pro and college sports leagues that ended with the U.S. Supreme Court clearing the way for all 50 states to offer sports betting.

Christie also urged states to resist granting the leagues “integrity fees,” which are essentially a slice of the action on sports bets. Leagues have pushed for the fees unsuccessfully so far in the states that have legalized sports gambling.

Christie also says states should refuse demands to use official league data in sports betting.

The leagues support federal regulation of sports betting in a bill that was introduced last month.

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More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

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