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MLB All-Star Hospitalized After Suffering Scary Head Shot in Spring Training Game

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Boston Red Sox infielder Justin Turner needed 16 stitches after he was hit in the face by a pitch during Monday’s spring training game against the Detroit Tigers.

The 38-year-old Turner fell to the ground after getting drilled by right-hander Matt Manning.

Medical personnel rushed to the plate, and Turner was bleeding and had a towel on his face as he walked off the field.

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Turner’s wife, Kourtney, posted to Instagram that the infielder had “16 stitches and a lot of swelling but we are thanking God for no fractures & clear scans.”

“He’s receiving treatment for soft tissue injuries, and is being monitored for a concussion,” the Red Sox said in a statement. “He will undergo further testing, and we’ll update as we have more information.

“Justin is stable, alert, and in good spirits given the circumstances.”

The two-time All-Star signed a $15 million, one-year deal with Red Sox during the offseason after spending the past nine years with the Los Angeles Dodgers.

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He hit .278 with 13 homers and 81 RBIs in 128 games last season.

Turner was also hit in the face by a pitch while attempting to bunt during the 2003 College World Series with Cal State Fullerton.

With his face bloodied and swollen, Turner left the game against Stanford assisted by trainers.

He was later taken to Bergan Mercy Hospital for precautionary X-rays that revealed bruises but no fractures.

He also sprained his ankle trying to avoid the pitch.

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

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