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Tesla Recalls 363,000 Vehicles Over Safety Concerns

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U.S. safety regulators have pressured Tesla into recalling nearly 363,000 vehicles with its “Full Self-Driving” system because it misbehaves around intersections and doesn’t always follow speed limits.

The recall, part of a larger investigation by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration into Tesla’s automated driving systems, is the most serious action taken yet against the electric vehicle maker.

It raises questions about CEO Elon Musk’s claims that he can prove to regulators that cars equipped with “Full Self-Driving” are safer than humans and that humans almost never have to touch the controls.

Musk at one point had promised that a fleet of autonomous robotaxis would be in use in 2020. The latest action appears to push that development further into the future.

The safety agency said in documents posted on its website Thursday that Tesla will fix the concerns with an online software update in the coming weeks. The documents said Tesla is doing the recall but does not agree with an agency analysis of the problem.

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The system, which is being tested on public roads by as many as 400,000 Tesla owners, makes unsafe actions, such as traveling straight through an intersection while in a turn-only lane, failing to come to a complete stop at stop signs, or going through an intersection during a yellow traffic light without proper caution, NHTSA said.

In addition, the system may not adequately respond to changes in posted speed limits, or it may not account for the driver’s adjustments in speed, the documents said.

“FSD beta software that allows a vehicle to exceed speed limits or travel through intersections in an unlawful or unpredictable manner increases the risk of a crash,” the agency said in documents.

Musk complained Thursday on Twitter, which he now owns, that calling an over-the-air software update a recall is “anachronistic and just flat wrong!” A message was left Thursday seeking further comment from Tesla, which has disbanded its media relations department.

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Tesla has received 18 warranty claims that could be caused by the software from May 2019 through Sept. 12, 2022, the documents said. But the Austin, Texas, electric vehicle maker told the agency it is not aware of any deaths or injuries.

In a statement, NHTSA said it found the problem during tests performed as part of an investigation into Tesla’s “Full Self-Driving” and “Autopilot” software that take on some driving tasks.

“As required by law and after discussions with NHTSA, Tesla launched a recall to repair those defects,” the agency said.

Despite the names “Full Self-Driving” and “Autopilot,” Tesla says on its website that the cars cannot drive themselves and owners must be ready to intervene at all times.

NHTSA’s testing found that “Autosteer on City Streets,” which is part of Tesla’s FSD beta testing, “led to an unreasonable risk to motor vehicle safety based on insufficient adherence to traffic safety laws.”

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In documents, NHTSA said that on Jan. 25, as part of regular communications with Tesla, it told the automaker about concerns with FSD, and it asked Tesla to do a recall. Both sides met numerous times in the following days, and on Feb. 7, Tesla decided to do the recall out of an abundance of caution “while not concurring with the agency’s analysis.”

The recall is another in a long list of problems that Tesla has with the U.S. government. In January, the company disclosed that the U.S. Justice Department had requested documents from Tesla about “Full Self-Driving” and “Autopilot.”

NHTSA has been investigating Tesla’s automated systems since June 2016 when a driver using Autopilot was killed after his Tesla went under a tractor-trailer crossing its path in Florida. A separate probe into Teslas that were using Autopilot when they crashed into emergency vehicles started in August 2021. At least 14 Teslas have crashed into emergency vehicles while using the Autopilot system.

Including the Florida crash, NHTSA has sent investigators to 35 Tesla crashes in which automated systems are suspected of being used. Nineteen people have died in those crashes, including two motorcyclists.

The agency is also investigating complaints that Teslas can brake suddenly for no reason.

Since January 2022, Tesla has issued 20 recalls, including several that were required by NHTSA. The recalls include one from January of last year for “Full Self-Driving” vehicles being programmed to run stop signs at slow speeds. Others included seat belt chimes that may not sound when vehicles are started and drivers haven’t buckled up, heat pumps that don’t defrost windshields quickly enough, and cars that make sounds that obscure pedestrian warnings.

“Full Self-Driving” went on sale late in 2015, and Musk has used the name ever since. It currently costs $15,000 to activate the system.

The recall announced Thursday covers certain 2016-2023 Model S and Model X vehicles, as well as 2017 through 2023 Model 3s and 2020 through 2023 Model Y vehicles equipped with the software or with installation pending.

Shares of Tesla were down about 5 percent late Thursday afternoon. The stock has rallied about 64 percent in the year to date, reversing 2022’s hefty loss.

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

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