Thief must pay $28K to fix stolen 'Dukes of Hazzard' Sno-Cat

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EAGLE, Colo. (AP) — A Colorado man has been ordered to pay more than $28,000 to cover damages after he pleaded guilty to stealing a Sno-Cat painted to look like the “General Lee” car featured in the TV series “The Dukes of Hazzard.”

The Vail Daily reports the owners of the Sno-Cat said Jason Cuervo damaged the tracks, axles and electrical system after stealing it last year.

Authorities say Cuervo hitched a trailer holding the Sno-Cat to his pickup truck in Minturn and hauled it along Interstate 70 to Grand Junction.

He was arrested a few weeks later at an auto shop.

Cuervo blamed the crime on his opioid addiction and is serving three years in a community corrections program after pleading guilty to aggravated motor vehicle theft.

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Information from: Vail Daily, http://www.vaildaily.com/

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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