Share
News

Border Officers Catch Smuggler Using 'Inhumane' Method: Hiding a Man Inside a Car Seat

Share

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers in Southern California found a Mexican national hidden inside a car seat — a tactic CBP described as “inhumane” — crossing into the United States on Monday night.

An 18-year-old woman driving a black Mitsubishi arrived at the Calexico West port of entry at approximately 1:10 a.m., according to a CPB media release.

The driver, a U.S. citizen, and her car were sent for further inspection by the booth officer.

When a CPB canine examined the car and alerted officers to the vehicle’s rear seat, they discovered a 48-year-old man hidden inside a non-factory compartment.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the Calexico downtown port of entry found a man concealed inside the rear seat of a car.
(U.S. Customs and Border Protection)
Trending:
Former NYPD Chief Calls Big Brian Laundrie Development 'Very Strange,' Suggests 'Something Is Amiss'

The man, a Mexican native, was taken for further processing and the woman was taken into custody and is being held at the Imperial County Jail.

“The primary focus of our national security mission is to protect the American homeland from all threats,” Pete Flores, CBP director of field operations for San Diego, said.

“Although we routinely encounter individuals attempting to enter our country illegally, this incident serves as another example of the inhumane tactics human smugglers will utilize in order to circumvent our laws,” Flores said.

Do you think the Trump administration is doing enough to curb illegal immigration?

This is not the first instance this year that federal agents have found people hiding inside vehicles crossing the border.

In February, Texas border agents arrested 36 illegal immigrants found beneath a wooden plank inside a dump truck in the South Texas corridor, Fox News reported.

The immigrants were hidden underneath a wooden plank inside the truck that appeared to be filled with gravel and dirt.

Customs and Border Protection agents also discovered 70 illegal immigrants inside a commercial tractor-trailer in December.

Related:
Watch: Migrant Caravan Tears Through Mexican Federal Police Within Seconds of Making Contact

The truck’s driver was a U.S. citizen and was arrested for his part in the plot to enter the United States illegally.

The acting commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, Mark Morgan, said he was disturbed by the “marked shirts” the migrants were wearing, which were thought to classify and identify the individuals, similar to the process of marking transported commodities and cargo.

“Obviously, the investigation is still ongoing to definitively determine what that letter meant on their T-shirts, but preliminary reports suggest that alien smuggling organization’s moniker representing that they had responsibility for those individuals,” Morgan said at the time.

In a Thursday news release, Customs and Border Protection reported it conducted 37,119 total enforcement actions last month, including 30,068 apprehensions and 7,051 inadmissibility decisions.

CBP said February’s number of apprehensions represented a 74 percent decrease from the peak of the border crisis in May 2019.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



loading

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , ,
Share
Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. A University of Oregon graduate, Erin has conducted research in data journalism and contributed to various publications as a writer and editor.
Erin Coates was an editor for The Western Journal for over two years before becoming a news writer. She grew up in San Diego, California, proceeding to attend the University of Oregon and graduate with honors holding a degree in journalism. During her time in Oregon, Erin was an associate editor for Ethos Magazine and a freelance writer for Eugene Magazine. She has conducted research in data journalism, which has been published in the book “Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future.” Erin is an avid runner with a heart for encouraging young girls and has served as a coach for the organization Girls on the Run. As a writer and editor, Erin strives to promote social dialogue and tell the story of those around her.
Birthplace
Tucson, Arizona
Nationality
American
Honors/Awards
Graduated with Honors
Education
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, University of Oregon
Books Written
Contributor for Data Journalism: Past, Present and Future
Location
Prescott, Arizona
Languages Spoken
English, French
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Health, Entertainment, Faith




loading

Conversation